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Texas Military DepartmentThe Texas Military Department is composed of the three branches of the military in the state of Texas. These branches are the Texas Army National Guard, the Texas Air National Guard, and the Texas State Guard. All three branches are administered by the state Adjutant General, an appointee of the Governor of Texas, and fall under the command of the Governor.

 


  • Texas Hall of Honor welcomes two new inductees

    Story By: Sgt. Michael Giles

    Posted On: May 17, 2016

     Sgt. Michael Giles Maj. Gen. John F. Nichols, Texas Military Forces adjutant general, inducts retired Chief Master Sgt. Johnny D. Jones into the Texas Military Forces Museum Hall of Honor at Camp Mabry, Texas, May 14, 2016. (Texas Army National Guard Photo by Army Sgt. Michael Giles/Released)
    Sgt. Michael Giles
    Maj. Gen. John F. Nichols, Texas Military Forces adjutant general, inducts retired Chief Master Sgt. Johnny D. Jones into the Texas Military Forces Museum Hall of Honor at Camp Mabry, Texas, May 14, 2016. (Texas Army National Guard Photo by Army Sgt. Michael Giles/Released)

    AUSTIN, Texas (May 14, 2016) -- The Texas Military Department celebrated the contributions of two lifetime senior enlisted members by inducting them into the Hall of Honor May 14, 2016, at Camp Mabry.

    The two retired military leaders, Sgt. Maj. Elwood H. Imken of the Texas Army National Guard, and Chief Master Sgt. Johnny D. Jones of the Texas Air Guard, received recognition for long and impactful military careers when they joined the ranks of the nearly 100 members who have been inducted since the tradition began in 1980.

    The Hall of Honor, a room in the Texas Military Forces Museum, displays portraits and histories of military members whose leadership played key roles in transforming the Texas Military Department in positive ways. Texas military regulations state that Hall of Honor nominees need to have demonstrated positive impact through pioneering efforts or by changing the "outlook and focus of the organization."

    Imken's 49 years of combined military and civilian federal service included leadership roles in training, disaster relief, and community outreach missions such as Food for Families and Blue Santa. He said he learned early in his career that planning and program management were important for taking care of Soldiers, because training time for Guard Soldiers was limited.

    "You knew you had to do good planning," Imken said. "If you didn't do good planning and task analysis on things, you couldn't do anything."

    Imken's advice for young service members looking to support the military in positive change is to work to make things less complicated.

    "The biggest thing is listen, learn, use common sense and keep things simple," Imken said.

    Jones, a 38-year veteran of the Air Force and Air National Guard, served in Vietnam, Desert Storm/Shield as well as Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. His pioneering included breaking a record for transporting loads during Desert Storm and facilitating the emergency airlift of a 30-ton cooling tower by C-130, a feat that had never before been accomplished.

    Jones said he was shocked to learn that his image and story would be placed on the wall in the Hall of Honor.

    "Many times I've read the narratives and looked at the photos of the people on that wall," Jones said. "I never expected to be on that wall with them."

    Hall of Honor inductees such as Imken and Jones have made the Air and Army National Guards far stronger than they used to be, said Maj. Gen. John F. Nichols, the Adjutant General for Texas. He explained that leaders such as these have brought the Texas Military Department out of times when they were under-funded and under-equipped so that they can play key roles in national defense and domestic response.

    "We owe our present conditions to them," Nichols said. "It is our honor to honor them, because they honored us by serving. We owe them that same honor to thank them for what they did for us."

  • Lone Star Gunfighters navigate challenges to produce F-16 pilots

    Story by: 2nd Lt. Phil Fountain

    Posted: May 5, 2016

    2nd Lt. Phil Fountain  Lt. Col. Bryan Carlson (right), an F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot and commander of the 149th Maintenance Group, visits with Chief Master Sgt. John D. Mead (left), the group’s maintenance operations flight superintendent, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, April 15, 2016. Carlson and Mead are members of the Texas Air National Guard’s 149th Fighter Wing, headquartered at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, which is currently operating at Luke while San Antonio’s Kelly Field undergoes runway repairs. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by 2nd Lt. Phil Fountain) 160415-Z-DJ352-001
    2nd Lt. Phil Fountain 
    Lt. Col. Bryan Carlson (right), an F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot and commander of the 149th Maintenance Group, visits with Chief Master Sgt. John D. Mead (left), the group’s maintenance operations flight superintendent, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, April 15, 2016. Carlson and Mead are members of the Texas Air National Guard’s 149th Fighter Wing, headquartered at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, which is currently operating at Luke while San Antonio’s Kelly Field undergoes runway repairs. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by 2nd Lt. Phil Fountain) 160415-Z-DJ352-001

    LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona (April 15, 2016) – Each year, the 149th Fighter Wing, headquartered at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, trains F-16 Fighting Falcon student pilots for the Total Force – U.S. Air Force, Air National Guard and U.S. Air Force Reserve. Their courses include: initial qualification training, instructor pilot upgrade training and senior leader re-qualification training.

    This year, the Texas Air National Guard unit, whose members are known as the Lone Star Gunfighters, is overcoming unusual adversity to achieve their Air Force objectives.

    The current challenges include a temporary relocation of operations from San Antonio’s Kelly Field to Luke Air Force Base, near Phoenix, to numerous maintenance issues affecting their aircraft fleet.

    “Each year, in April, we come to Arizona to allow the students to be able to participate in a large force employment exercises,” said Lt. Col. Bryan Carlson, an instructor pilot and commander of the 149th Maintenance Group.

    “It allows them to fly with other airplanes from other services and to fly beyond just a four-ship, to employ as an eight-ship and beyond, and to fly against multiple targets,” Carlson said. “And it allows them to drop heavy weights and live bombs.”

    The trip to Arizona is not new, but the length of the stay is, Carlson said. Typically, the trip is a two-week temporary duty that incorporates the ANG unit’s annual training requirements, but now they have been in-place for nearly two months.....READ MORE

     

  • Texas Guardsman saves lives of Danish citizens; awarded Danish Defense Medal for Special Meritorious Service

    Story by: Capt. Martha Nigrelle

    Posted On: April 22, 2016

    CAPTION:  Capt. Bradley Grimm, center,Texas Army National Guard, receives the Danish Defense Medal for Special Meritorious Efforts by Danish Defense Gen. Peter Bartram, left, and American ambassador to Denmark Rufus Gifford, right, at a ceremony held in Denmark, April 19, 2016.  Grimm was instrumental in foiling a terrorist plot to bomb a Danish school and assisted Danish security forces in making an arrest. (Danish Military photo by Sune Wadskjær/Released)
    Capt. Bradley Grimm, center,Texas Army National Guard, receives the Danish Defense Medal for Special Meritorious Efforts by Danish Defense Gen. Peter Bartram, left, and American ambassador to Denmark Rufus Gifford, right, at a ceremony held in Denmark, April 19, 2016. Grimm was instrumental in foiling a terrorist plot to bomb a Danish school and assisted Danish security forces in making an arrest. (Danish Military photo by Sune Wadskjær/Released)

    AUSTIN, Texas – Texas National Guard Capt. Bradley Grimm was awarded the Danish Defense Medal for Special Meritorious Service in a ceremony held in Denmark, April 19, 2016.

    “Capt. Grimm provided actionable intelligence about a bomb threat against a school in Denmark,” said Col. Steve Warren, a spokesman for Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve. “The information he provided helped to foil a plot, and resulted in an arrest and a confiscation of explosives. Brad's work likely saved the lives of Danish citizens.”

    The information included a bomb threat against a Danish school.

    According to Warren, Grimm helped develop a system to speed the flow of intelligence from the ground up to national capitals. This system was paramount in identifying the Danish authorities of the terrorist threat.

    “It’s not every day an American captain receives a very high, prestigious medal from a foreign country,” Warren said.

    Defense Gen. Peter Bartram, Danish Defense Chief, presented Grimm with the Danish Defense Medal for Meritorious Service with special honors.

    According to a Danish officer, not only is the award one of the highest awards in Denmark, but also the special meritorious duty citation makes this award very rare. The medal is awarded infrequently, even to Danes, and is roughly equivalent to something more than a Legion of Merit, but less than a Silver Star.

    The medal was originally awarded for meritorious deployment outside of Denmark, but after 2010, the Danish government began awarding it to civilians or military personnel for meritorious service for the betterment of the Danish Defense.

    “Capt. Grimm’s actions had a monumental impact on our allies in Denmark, and consequently on our coalition in the fight against international terrorism,” said Maj. Gen. John F. Nichols, the Adjutant General of Texas. “He embodies what our force stands for – Duty, Honor, Texas.”

  • Texas Guardsmen rescue 140 in Houston floods

    Story by: Capt. Martha Nigrelle

    Posted: April 21, 2016

    Texas Guardsmen from the 736th Component Repair Company, 36th Sustainment Brigade, 36th Infantry Division work alongside local and state emergency responders to rescue Texans in need from severe flooding in Houston, Texas, April 19, 2016. Texas Guardsmen, working with Harris County emergency response units and Texas Task Force 1, rescued 140 people in five hours. (U.S. Army National Guard photo courtesy of 736th Component Repair Company, 36th Sustainment Brigade/Released)
    Texas Guardsmen from the 736th Component Repair Company, 36th Sustainment Brigade, 36th Infantry Division work alongside local and state emergency responders to rescue Texans in need from severe flooding in Houston, Texas, April 19, 2016. Texas Guardsmen, working with Harris County emergency response units and Texas Task Force 1, rescued 140 people in five hours. (U.S. Army National Guard photo courtesy of 736th Component Repair Company, 36th Sustainment Brigade/Released)

    HOUSTON – Texas Guardsmen from the 736th Component Repair Company, 36th Infantry Division, pulled 140 people to safety from severe flooding in Houston, April 19, 2016.

    Working alongside Harris County Police officers, firefighters, Sheriff’s Office and Texas Task Force 1, guardsmen worked through the night to help Texans in need.

    After linking up with partner emergency responders at the Harris County Fireman Training Center in Humble, the soldiers split up to provide assistance to severely flooded neighborhoods, sending half of their trucks to Ponderosa, a neighborhood located on the north side of Houston.

    “We went into the water for about an hour and a half and came out with about 20 people,” said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Michael Hoover, 736th Component Repair Company. “One of our other trucks stayed in the water until after 9 p.m. and pulled out 90 people.”

    Each truck went out with officers from the Sheriff’s Office or the local police department and some also went with boat rescue squads from Texas Task Force 1.

    “Our trucks can only go into 40 inches of water,” said Hoover, explaining that some of their trucks went out worked with rescue boats. “Task Force 1 boats would go ahead of us in their boats and bring them back to the truck, then we would bring them to dry land.”

    The Emergency Medical Technicians, working with 9-1-1 dispatch, received addresses of distressed citizens, and passed the addresses on to guardsmen and firefighters so they could respond. 

    “As we would go to the address, we would pick up others who needed help,” said Sgt. Allan Abel, 736th Component Repair Company. “We were supposed to stop at dark, but we got four priority calls just after dark and that took us a while because we kept filling up with people.”

    Deep waters made military land navigation training important in their ability to help those in need....READ MORE

     

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  • Texas National Guard Sergeant Major to be inducted to Hall of Honor

    Texas Army National Guard retired Sgt. Maj. Elwood H Imken will be inducted into the Texas Military Department’s Hall of Honor for his extraordinary impact on the Texas Military, during a ceremony at Camp Mabry in Austin, May 14, 2016...READ MORE

  • Van Native breveted to Army Brigadier General

    “To get to serve the great state of Texas is an honor,” Flynn said. “It’s an honor I truly hope I am worthy of.”...READ MORE

  • The long, proud history of the Texas State Guard: Balloon Bombs in WWII

     “The balloon was about 30-feet high when extended and carried five metal canisters,” said Wade Cowan, a member of the squad that located it. “Four were incendiaries and one was a fragmentary, or anti-personnel bomb.”...READ MORE

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