Your total enlistment period will be eight years, but you can serve as little as three or six years, and spend the remainder in IRR (Individual Ready Reserve). IRR Soldiers don't train with a unit, but can still be called up in the event of an emergency. Your local recruiter can explain how this works, discuss your options with you, and help you make the best choice for your needs.

Absolutely. Your Guard service is only part time—just one weekend per month, and one two-week period each year. Plus, the Texas Army National Guard can help you pay for college or prepare to become an officer.

See how the Texas Army National Guard helps with school.

Recruits need to meet certain standards of height, weight, age, fitness and education in order to enlist. Your Texas Army National Guard representative will have complete information.

Yes. Because of the National Guard's dual state-federal mission, Guard members can be mobilized to protect and defend America in battle domestically or overseas. Should this happen, you'll be trained, ready and prepared to go, mentally and physically.

Our mission makes us different. Unlike the other Armed Forces branches, we have a dual mission, meaning we answer to both state and federal governments. So Guard Soldiers can be deployed by either the governor of their resident state or the president of the United States, depending on where they are needed most.

Your total income is a combination of several things: monthly paycheck, enlistment bonuses, cash incentives, benefits such as medical and retirement, education funding and other benefits. Use the Pay Calculator located in left-side tab under Soldier Resources to learn more.

We'll train you for an exciting, competitive career. You'll make good money now, plus accumulate benefits for your future. You'll develop skills that will help you in every aspect of your life, including leadership, the spirit of teamwork, confidence, courage and the seven Army Values.

Your total enlistment period will be eight years, but you can serve as little as three or six years, and spend the remainder in IRR (Individual Ready Reserve). IRR Soldiers don't train with a unit, but can still be called up in the event of an emergency. A recruiter can explain how this works, discuss your options with you, and help you make the best choice for your needs.

That's up to you. When you enlist, you'll choose a job—known as a Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) Military Occupational Specialty (MOS):
Texas Army National Guard speak for “your job.” Every job title in the Guard has a code, using a number and letter. For example, a Cavalry Scout is MOS 19D (19 Delta). You may choose from more than 150 options in several career fields. Aviation, Infantry, Military Police (MP) and Public Affairs are just a few of the many fields we offer.

It's hard. Intense. Demanding. You'll love it. Basic Training is a 10-week intensive course of exercises and drills designed to toughen you up inside and out. The time is broken down into three phases of roughly three weeks each, designed to take you from an ordinary civilian to Citizen-Soldier. 

Find out more about Basic Training.

Technically, it could be anywhere. Most likely, you'll attend drill at the armory nearest your hometown, and if called to action, remain in-state. However, in major emergencies, such as in Hurricane Katrina, you could be sent to another state to help. It's also possible you'll be deployed in support of combat operations, such as to the Middle East to assist in the War on Terrorism.

You'll train one weekend per month plus a two-week period each year. For most of the training weekends, you'll be with us Saturday and Sunday only, though occasionally you'll be asked to report for duty on a Friday night. In case of Active Duty, you will serve whenever you are needed and called.

You'll enter as a Private (E-1), and become eligible for promotion to Private (E-2) after six months in service. You should be eligible to become Private First Class (E-3) after only 12 months of service, and at least four months serving as an E-2. Factors such as your education status, Eagle Scout certification or participation in the Stripes For Skills program can allow you to enter as an E-2, E-3 or even E-4 (with a bachelor's degree). 

The length of time for deployments will vary, depending on the situation. State active duty missions usually run from 15-60 days, while federal deployments are usually a minimum of 12 months. Texas Army National Guard Soldiers may also choose to volunteer for active duty assignments (for example, Border Patrol), and again, the length of deployment will vary.

Possibly. Our financial assistance packages and Texas Army National Guard Support Center help prepare you for college—from providing funds to prepping you for entrance exams. So when you’re ready to apply, you’ll be organized, prepared and the funding will be in the bank—which could increase your education options.

See how the Texas Army National Guard helps with college.

Definitely. Our Texas Army National Guard Support Center is a full-service education assistance station, offering not only one-on-one help with the administrative aspects of applying, but also degree planning, distance learning options and much more.

Learn more about Texas Army National Guard education programs.

Enough to pay for your tuition, expenses such as books and supplies, and to repay existing student loans. We take your education seriously, and, like you, make it a priority. From 100% Tuition Assistance, to Student Loan Repayment to the Montgomery G.I. Bill and its Kicker, our financial assistance programs can virtually cover it all.

See how the Guard pays for college.

That varies from school to school, but most schools will work with you in some way to smooth out details of that eventuality.

Currently enrolled high school juniors/seniors, high school graduates and GED holders are eligible. It's never too soon to speak to a recruiter about getting started.

Learn more about education programs.

These days, a college degree doesn't guarantee a good job. Many grads still start out in low-paying positions. In the National Guard, you'll train for a job in the field of your choice. So along with your degree, you'll have the experience and training you need to skip entry-level jobs and go straight into a lucrative career. Plus, Guard experience stands out on your resume, so employers know you've got the skills they're looking for—discipline, teamwork and leadership.

It depends on your objective in enlisting. If your goal is to accrue time toward retirement benefits, you must be able to complete 20 combined years of service by age 60. The PS applicant 35 years of age or older has prior qualifying service which can then be subtracted from their current age, bringing their enlistment age to less than "35," and the applicant can qualify for retired pay by age 60.

Example: PS applicant is 47 years old with 13 years of qualifying service, which brings the applicant to an enlistment age of "34." If the applicant only had 12 years of qualifying service, then the enlistment age would be "35" and the applicant would not be qualified.

If retirement benefits are not your objective in joining, your maximum age will depend on your specific service history. No two situations are alike. Please speak to a recruiter to discuss how your age affects your enlistment.

Along with your monthly paycheck, we offer financing and administrative support for your higher education, retirement benefits, cash incentives, special bonuses, an Guard Support Center to help with school administrative matters, free space-available travel on military aircraft, a possible enlistment bonus and much more. 

Learn about Guard benefits.

The Guard offers financial, guidance counseling and administrative support. Our funding packages such as 100% Tuition Assistance, Student Loan Repayment, and the Montgomery G.I. Bill and Kicker, can cover virtually all of your tuition and expenses, plus pay off student loans. Our Guard Support Center offers one-on-one help with entrance exams, paperwork, degree planning, distance learning options and much more.

Learn more about education benefits.

New National Guard recruits must meet certain physical qualifications—height, weight, fitness level—to enlist in the Guard in the first place. Basic Training Basic Training:
Basic Training (BT) is a 10-week course of intense physical and mental training, during which recruits develop essential Soldier skills, discipline and values.

After exploring the many aspects of life in the National Guard, your child’s opinion and your own assessment of their readiness are often a good indicator. But if you’d like additional opinions, feel free to discuss it with a recruiter. No matter what stage of emotional development your child is in when they enter the Guard, they will soon be stronger, more confident and more capable than ever.

The benefits of service in the Guard include financial rewards, education assistance, career training, character development, leadership skills and a solid foundation of confidence, capability and courage that will remain with every Soldier throughout their military and civilian life.

The full National Guard service term is eight years. However, there are several active service options within that time frame. For example, your child can commit to just three active years then enter IRR (Individual Ready Reserve) for the remainder of their term. There are also options of four- and six-year active terms. The exact program you choose will depend on several conditions, all of which you’ll discuss with your recruiter.

Learn more about enlistment options.

We can help your child with the financial, administrative and guidance aspects of their college planning. Because getting a higher education is one of our top priorities, the National Guard offers assistance with virtually every aspect of their education. Our Guard Support Center is an invaluable resource designed for this purpose.

Learn more about education in the Guard.

Yes. We keep our Soldiers busy, and there won’t be a great deal of time to chat due to the abbreviated training periods, but telephone, email and mail are all available and accessible.

Training—also known as drilling—is generally done at the armory nearest your resident city. So your child will usually not be far from home. However, if called to Active Duty, they may be sent out-of-state or even overseas for a period of time.

No. Their Guard service will be part time, leaving plenty of time for college and even another job. In fact, the Guard can make going to college easier, with financial assistance and guidance counseling. However, some students choose to attend Basic Training Basic Training:
Basic Training (BT) is a 10-week course of intense physical and mental training, during which recruits develop essential Soldier skills, discipline and values.
Advanced Individual Training (AIT):  Following Basic Training, Soldiers attend AIT to learn a military job skill. Depending on the specialty, training ranges from 1 month to 1 year. 

Learn about Guard education benefits.

There are specific enlistment standards—height, weight, physical fitness, age and education level. Your Guard representative will be able to help determine if you are within these requirements.

Possibly. Our financial assistance packages and Guard Support Center offer funding, counseling, entrance exam preparation, administrative support and much more. So when your student is ready to apply, their ducks are in a row, they have the support they need, and their education options can improve greatly.

Learn more about Guard education benefits.

Yes. Our Guard Support Center is a full-service education assistance station, offering one-on-one help with the administrative aspects of applying, degree planning, distance learning options and much more.

Learn more about Guard assistance for students.

Yes, college students who are Soldiers can be deployed, but most schools will work with students to smooth out details in the event that happens.

Yes. High school students can enlist and undergo  and drill periods prior to graduating but can’t begin Advanced Individual Training (AIT): Following Basic Training, Soldiers attend AIT to learn a military job skill. Depending on the specialty, training ranges from 1 month to 1 year.

The National Guard is a part-time commitment. Your drill periods typically consist of one weekend per month, and one annual two-week period. Annual training can run slightly longer, depending on your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS):  Guard speak for “your job.” Every job title in the Guard has a code, using a number and letter. For example, a Cavalry Scout is MOS 19D (19 Delta).

That depends on a combination of things, including your current Military Occupational Specialty (MOS):
Guard speak for “your job.” Every job title in the Guard has a code, using a number and letter. For example, a Cavalry Scout is MOS 19D (19 Delta).  Ask your recruiter what you want to do in the Guard, and where you'd like to serve. Typically, it will be at an armory near your hometown. 

Check out our Unit Finder.

You can enlist for as few as three years, with an additional commitment to the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). IRR Soldiers don't train with a unit, but can still be called up in the event of an emergency.

MEPS stands for Military Entrance Processing Station. There are 65 MEPS throughout the U.S. where applicants are processed and receive physical exams prior to shipment to Basic Training Basic Training:
Basic Training (BT) is a 10-week course of intense physical and mental training, during which recruits develop essential Soldier skills, discipline and values. METS stands for Military Entrance Testing Site, any of 14,000 locations where you can take your Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is a series of tests used to determine an applicant's qualification for military service and help determine their intellectual and occupational strengths.

The National Guard serves both the federal and state governments and can be called into action by each state's governor during domestic emergencies, such as storms, floods and civil disturbances. In addition, the president can activate the National Guard to participate in federal missions and overseas deployments. The Army Reserve is controlled by the federal government and supports only the Active Army and federal missions.

Also, while the National Guard offers Federal Tuition Assistance up to $4,500 per year, and in most states, State Supplemental Grants to cover up to 100% of tuition costs at state universities, the Army Reserve cannot offer State Supplemental Grants to its members.

The Guard is a military branch that serves both state and federal governments, at home and overseas. Guard Soldiers are trained for combat operations, but are also equipped and ready to help civilians during disasters or emergencies.

Guard pay is based on your rank and the number of years you've served, along with incentives like hazardous-duty pay. However, there are several jobs that pay an additional bonus when you sign up.

Your pay depends on a few different factors, but you won't make less than $183 for every weekend you drill.

Different states may offer commissioning bonuses for critical skill positions. Other bonuses may also be available, but will vary from state to state. Please check with your local Guard representative for current bonus information.

Some jobs may train for slightly longer (up to 21 days), and you’ll be paid for every day you work. Don’t forget that any time you're called up for service for any reason—like assisting your state during a natural disaster—you’ll be earning Active Duty Pay.

This depends on your rank. The higher your rank, the higher your pay. And since Chaplains enter the Guard as officers, you'll be guaranteed officer pay and benefits.

Your salary as a warrant officer will depend on your rank. There are five ranks and five corresponding pay grades for Warrant Officers in the National Guard: WO1 – WO5.

There are different ways to become an officer. If you’re heading to college, the ROTC program is the way to go. If you're already in the enlisted ranks, you can attend Officer Candidate School. And candidates with special qualifications, such as attorneys, chaplains and medical professionals, may be eligible for direct commission.

The training period varies for each job. Some schools take as few as 4-9 weeks, while other more specialized or critical jobs take up to 64 weeks. For Special Forces, training is even longer.

 For certain career specialties, particularly medical professions, the Guard will reimburse up to $50,000 in student loans (some medical and dental specialties may be eligible for even more). Your recruiter will have the most current information.

  • Medical - $240,000

  • Chaplain - $80,000

  • Enlisted - $50,000

There are a couple of ways to become an aviator, depending on your military or civilian status. Both require that you qualify and complete Warrant Officer Candidate School (WOCS) and Warrant Officer Flight Training (WOFT) through the U.S. Army. You need to be at least 18 years old, and not have reached your 33rd birthday by the time of selection.

Learn more about Warrant Officer Candidate School.

There's not a direct path toward becoming a helicopter pilot. Ask your recruiter about openings in an aviation unit, and check out the necessary steps to become eligible for flight training. These include taking the Alternate Flight Aptitude Selection Test (AFAST) and attending Warrant Officer Candidate School before beginning a year-long flight training course.

Learn about warrant officer aviators.

You'll want to contact your commanding officer, and start your Warrant Officer Flight Packet. Typically, a candidate must be a Sergeant (E-5) or above to become a warrant officer, but you may qualify as a Warrant Officer Flight Training Candidate. Check out the Warrant Officer Applicant Guide.

Learn more about warrant officers.

In addition to having completed Basic Training Basic Training:
Basic Training (BT) is a 10-week course of intense physical and mental training, during which recruits develop essential Soldier skills, discipline and values. You'll need to be at least 18 and not older than 33; have completed high school or your GED; score 90 or above on the Alternate Flight Aptitude Screening Test (AFAST); possess outstanding leadership qualities; provide Security Clearance and meet or exceed physical and eyesight standards.

Learn more about warrant officer aviators.

There are a number of medical careers in the Guard, and your rank will be based on your level of training and your education degree. Physicians generally enter at a minimum grade of Captain (O-3).

There are four: Dental, Nursing, Medical Specialists and Medical Service.

There are several. You must meet prescribed medical and moral standards. You must be a U.S. citizen. You need to have graduated from an accredited U.S. school of medicine or osteopathy or have a certificate from the Education Council of Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG). There are several others.

The Areas of Concentration in medicine are virtually all exciting, and all prepare you for a great career in the growing field of healthcare in civilian life. Here are just a few job titles: Nuclear Medical Science Officer, Environmental Scientist, Medevac Pilot or Clinical Psychologist.

The Physician Assistant is part of the Medical Service Corps. In this position you’ll work side-by-side with Guard physicians as the primary medical officer of your state medical command, infantry, battalion, armored cavalry squadron or other combat arms or support units.

As a medical professional, you won’t find a more exhilarating working environment than that of the National Guard. We use state-of-the-art equipment, emerging medical innovations, and you’ll often find yourself performing in a high-energy tailgate setting.

The financial and other benefits are extensive. Just to name a few: the Healthcare Professional Loan Repayment program (HPLR), bonuses and special pay incentives, Continuing Medical Education (CME) and our Flexible Training Policy. 

Learn more about becoming a specialty officer.

Yes, a great deal. Our financial programs and other support include a monthly paycheck, the Montgomery G.I. Bill, flexible training and clinical programs to complement your curriculum, and much more. 

All religions and belief systems are welcome in the Guard. To serve as a Guard Chaplain, your faith group must have a federally recognized endorsing agency that can issue an ecclesiastical endorsement for you. Typically, you will work with Soldiers from your own faith.

Chaplains attend Chaplain Officer Basic Leadership Course, a three-month program at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. This course teaches you to apply your civilian chaplain skills to the Army environment, prepares you physically and mentally to be an officer in the Guard, and covers the complexities of the First Amendment, freedom of expression, counseling, mentoring and leadership. This course can be completed in one block or several phases over a 24-month period.

Yes. You don't have to wait till graduation to join the Army National Guard chaplaincy. Training to be a Chaplain in the Guard while simultaneously training for the civilian ministry lets you earn a substantial paycheck while greatly adding to your education and experience.

You must be a U.S. citizen by birth or naturalized, pass a physical exam, and be between 21 and 42 years old. There are several educational requirements as well—be sure to look over the complete list of requirements for Army National Guard Chaplain Candidates.

This depends on your work experience and education level. Chaplains are officers in the Army National Guard and generally begin their career progression at the grade of 1LT (First Lieutenant). Advanced appointment as a CPT (Captain) may be possible under certain circumstances.

No. Chaplains are non-combatant and therefore never carry weapons. The Chaplain Assistant provides security for the Unit Ministry Team.

Chaplains are the spiritual leaders of the Army National Guard, providing emotional and religious support to Soldiers and their Families. You'll perform religious ceremonies, offer guidance and help Soldiers adjust to their military lives and experiences.

Learn more about the Chaplain Corps.

Yes. Because you'll encounter a variety of unique scenarios, we offer specialized training in the following fields: Suicide Prevention, Critical Incident Stress Management, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Marriage and Relationship Enhancement and Clinical Pastoral Education (for hospital chaplains).

To name just a few: self-discipline, initiative, confidence, intelligence, physical fitness, the ability to perform under pressure, leadership, the ability to make decisions quickly and complete missions and respect for subordinates.

To name just a few: self-discipline, initiative, confidence, intelligence, physical fitness, the ability to perform under pressure, leadership, the ability to make decisions quickly and complete missions and respect for subordinates.

The branch you’re with will be determined by two matters: your own preference and the unit you’re assigned to.

Learn more about becoming an officer.

Depending on their rank, officers typically make between $2,000 and $7,000 per month. Not bad for part-time work! 

Learn more about becoming an officer.

You must be at least 18 and not more than 41 years old to become an officer in the Army National Guard, except for medical professions—they take recruits up to 60 years old. Waivers may be authorized—speak to a recruiter for details.

No. But applicants for State or Accelerated OCS must have earned a minimum of 90 semester hours toward an accredited degree. Applicants for the State or Accelerated OCS program desiring appointment to the Medical Service (MS) Corps must have a baccalaureate degree prior to graduation. Applicants for Federal OCS must have earned a baccalaureate degree or higher prior to the start of the OCS class.

Learn more about becoming an officer.

Yes. There are three options: State OCS, Federal OCS and Accelerated OCS, each with its own timeline. You’ll choose based on your personal situation, including job requirements, time available and Family obligations. 

Learn more.

A higher monthly paycheck, financial assistance for continuing education, free space-available travel on military aircraft and much more.

Take a closer look at the National Guard officer benefits.

Being an officer in the National Guard requires a combination of personal and professional characteristics. Leadership skills, exceptional integrity, self-discipline, confidence and courage, the ability to make quick decisions and the willingness to accept moral responsibility for those decisions are just a few of the qualities officers must possess. 

Learn more.

If you're headed to college, you can become an Army National Guard officer through the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC):
ROTC is a college elective that allows you to earn a commission straight out of college as a second lieutenant in the Army. The course consists of both academic classes and hands-on training.
ROTC. This four-year course consists of a two-year Basic Course and a two-year Advanced Course. You'll then enter active service as a 2nd lieutenant.

Highly qualified candidates with expertise in legal or medical fields may be eligible for a Direct Commission Direct Commission:

Direct commission is one of the ways to become an officer in the Guard. A member of the chain of command nominates you for appointment as an officer, based on your professional skills (medical professional, legal or chaplain). Contact your local recruiter for information and program details.

To be considered for this elite program, you must have at least a Bachelor of Science degree (or equivalent) and receive a nomination and selection from your Commanding Officer. 

There are three Officer Candidate School (OCS) options available: State OCS, National Guard Bureau Accelerated OCS or Federal OCS. You should speak to a recruiter to determine which will best fit your circumstances. For more detail about each of these OCS options, check out the Commissioning Programs Packet.

Recruits attend Officer Candidate School during Basic Officer Leadership Course (BOLC)-A, where they learn what it means to be an officer. BOLC-B is the Leadership and Branch Training section for those who are already officers.

There are three phases of Basic Officer Leadership Course (BOLC). Times and locations vary according to your branch. For more information, contact your local recruiter or ask your commanding officer.

Warrant officers are a unique group. They are, in fact, commissioned officers, but they're also considered to be in a class by themselves due to their highly specialized technical expertise in specific areas. Put another way: commissioned officers are generalists, warrant officers are specialists.

Learn more about becoming a warrant officer.

The benefits for warrant officers are stellar. In addition to your monthly paycheck, you may be eligible for financing for higher education, tax-free shopping and recreation privileges at the bases, free travel on military aircraft when space is available, low-cost life insurance, retirement benefits and much more.

If a career in aviation is your goal, becoming a warrant officer is a first-class ticket. Warrant officers fly highly advanced aircraft like the UH-60 Black Hawk, CH-47 Chinook, OH-58 Kiowa Warrior and AH-64A Apache helicopters. Along with other requisite training, you’ll attend the Warrant Officer Flight Training (WOFT) program to attain your piloting skills.

Learn more.

Branches besides aviation include military intelligence, medical service, special forces, ordnance and field artillery.

Learn more.

After meeting the specific prerequisites, you'll start warrant officer candidate school. You'll hone your leadership and decision-making skills through progressive levels of training. You'll adapt to quick on the spot thinking and consequence management. There are two training options with prior military experience:

Six-week active resident course at Fort Rucker, Alabama, or Distance Learning plus four and a half weeks as E-5 with Warrior Leader Course
or:

Regional Training Institute within selected states, completing Distance Learning, five drills and a two-week Annual Training.
Learn more.

Warrant officers comprise about 2 percent of total Army personnel, and about 11 percent of Army Commissioned Officers. So as you can see, they’re not only a distinguished, prestigious group but a rare breed as well.

Yes. Please discuss this with a recruiter. 

You can see a list of all the job openings in your area by checking the National Guard's Job Board. 

Learn more about careers in the Guard. 

Most Prior Service members in the rank of Private (E-1) through Corporal (E-4) Soldiers are accepted back at the rank they held previously, but it is not guaranteed. E-5s and above have to be approved by the Unit Commander/State MILPO. Please contact your local National Guard recruiter for more details.

In two major ways: getting promotions and activating retirement benefits. Whatever military division you served in previously, your accrued time carries over into the Guard toward your overall military career. In addition, by joining the Guard, you continue earning points toward activating your retirement benefits. Your Montgomery G.I. Bill will also be extended upon enlistment.

Learn more from a Guard representative.

Prior Service enlistees (including OCS/WOCS) who have not successfully completed an United States Army BCT, WTC, or Marine Corp BCT course, completed training for Air Force or Navy Special Operations Forces, or Air Force Security Police during previous military Service must enter on IADT within 180 days after enlistment in the ARNG and successfully complete BCT conducted by the Army. Your recruiter can explain this in detail.

For applicants who have been honorably separated from the military and have a critical Military Occupational Specialty (MOS), you may be eligible for a $5,000 to $15,000 bonus when you enlist in the Army National Guard. Applicants cannot have more than 16 years of prior military service. Bonuses require a six-year enlistment. Applicants whose last discharge was from the Army National Guard or Army Reserve must wait 12 months from discharge date to be eligible. All periods of prior service must be characterized as Honorable.

You can't have more than 16 years total prior military service when you enlist in the Guard. You'll also need to have received an honorable discharge for all prior periods of service. Your Recruiter can answer any specific questions.

Prior service enlistees can qualify for up to $50,000 in student loan repayments. You'll need to reenlist for not less than 6 years, enlist in a deployable unit, and have at least one existing, qualifying loan at the time of your re-enlistment. Ask your recruiter about other requirements.

Prior service personnel are not automatically guaranteed to enter at the same rank they held when they were discharged. Most E-1 through E-4 Soldiers are accepted back at the rank they held previously—but again, it is not guaranteed. E-5s and above have to be approved by the Unit Commander/State MILPO. If you’re unsure of your previous grade, it will be listed on your DD-214 or NGB22. Please contact your local National Guard recruiter or RRNCO for more details.

Yes, provided you can complete 20 years of total military service by age 60, including service in any branch, your Guard time will be added to your prior military service and count toward your retirement benefits.

Learn more about retirement benefits.

Joining the National Guard after your Active Duty service is a great way to continue serving your country in a part-time status. National Guard Soldiers get good pay (the equivalent of four days of Active Duty for a weekend spent drilling) and great benefits, and continue building toward a military retirement. So no matter what your goals are for "life after Active Duty," you can achieve them in the National Guard.

You can request a copy of your DD-214 from your state Military/Veterans Affairs department. Veterans can also gain access to their DD-214 online, through the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC) website.

TRICARE Reserve Select premium rates are established annually on a calendar-year basis. You are required to pay the monthly premiums if you decide to enroll in TRICARE Reserve Select.

The 2012 monthly premiums are:

TRS Member-Only coverage: $54.35 per month 
TRS Member-and-Family coverage: $192.89 per month

The 2013 monthly premiums are:

TRS Member-Only coverage: $51.62 per month 
TRS Member-and-Family coverage: $195.81 per month

You can ask a question online at http://www.gibill.va.gov. Set up your own account by clicking on the Your Account tab on the FAQs page. You should receive a response within 72 hours.

Only the DVA can give you this information. You can call them at 1-888-442-4551 or contact them online at http://www.gibill.va.gov. Set up your own account by clicking on the Your Account tab on the FAQs page. You should receive a response within 72 hours.

Contact the GI Bill Support Team at gibill@ng.army.mil and scan any denied documentation, as we can validate your entitlements and help correct this action.

You are eligible for this benefit only once in your career. Once it has ended, it cannot be reinstated, even with a new enlistment contract.

Learn more.

Your Chapter 1606 GI Bill benefit is suspended while you are AGR. You may need to extend your enlistment to have it reinstated once you return as a traditional drilling Soldier.

Learn more.

You are eligible to continue receiving payments if you are medically discharged or if you were deployed prior to your benefit delimiting date. If you are medically discharged, you retain your benefits for 14 years from your original date of eligibility. If you were deployed, you have the time of deployment plus four months. For example, if you were deployed for 12 months, you have 16 months (12 months plus the additional four) from your date of discharge to use any remaining benefits.

YES. Texas Army National Guard Soldiers may use TA and the state tuition reimbursement program (STRP) with any GI Bill.  The only Soldiers who would not benefit from using TA or STRP with GI Bill are Soldiers who qualify for 100% of the CH 33 GI Bill.

YES.  Soldiers who have more than one GI Bill receive an additional 12 months of full-time benefits for a total of 48 months.  Soldiers may use up to 36 months of one GI Bill chapter and they may use the additional 12 months on a different chapter.  Soldiers are not eligible to use more than one chapter of GI Bill benefits at the same time.

The only transferable benefit is the Post 9/11 Chapter 33 GI Bill. 

NO. Once a Soldier retires, they are not eligible to transfer benefits to dependents. There are no exceptions. An Exception to Policy will not be considered.  Soldiers must transfer benefits prior to leaving the military. There will be a 4 year service requirement after benefits are transfered.

YES. In order to transfer your CH 33 GI Bill benefits to a spouse or child, you must first complete a minimum of 6 years of service. In addition, 4 years of service will be required AFTER benefits are transferred.

As of 20130801: ALL SOLDIERS WILL INCURE A 4 YEAR SERVICE OBLIGATION upon transferring their CH 33 GI Bill benefits; this means that regardless of how many years of service a Soldier has completed (6 years or 36 years), the Soldier will incur an additional 4 year service obligation from the date of transfer.  Soldiers who are barred from extending due to retirement or being involuntarily separated through the enlisted qualification board (EQRB) should complete the transferability application online regardless.  Upon receipt, the application will be processed on a case-by-case basis.

  • Spouses of Soldiers who are on active guard reserve (AGR) are not eligible to receive the housing stipend.  AGR children are eligible to receive the housing stipend.
  • Spouses of traditional drilling Soldiers and Soldiers who are on active duty operation support (ADOS) orders may receive the housing stipend. 

There is ONE STEP for the Service Member to complete. Print step 1 here:

Essentials for a Successful Post 9/11 CH 33 Transfer

If you have any problems accessing the required Statement of Understanding on the website, you can print it here:  SOU in PDF  or   SOU in Fillable Format 

Once the transfer has been approved, your spouse/ child will need to complete step 2.  Print step 2 here:  

Application Instructions For Family Members to Start Receiving Benefits

  • Submitting through VONAPP 
           When applying for GI Bill benefits, you have the option to upload qualifying documents (DD214s).

  • You may also submit a question at the VA website.  Note, if you have never submitted a question before you will have to register first. In the question you can state you would like an evaluation of your qualifying percentage and upload your documents for review.

  • Or mail them to:
           VA Regional Office

    PO Box 8888

    Muskogee, OK   74402-8888

Soldiers who are eligible for CH 33 GI Bill may choose to use the benefit to pay for books only, which are not covered by TA.  If a Soldier elects to use CH 33 for books only, the Soldier MUST specify this with the school and VA by requesting that the school submit an enrollment certification to VA with the necessary information.  When an individual only receives a books and supply payment, VA will make an entitlement charge of 1 day for every $41.67 paid, with any remaining amount rounded to the nearest amount evenly divisible by $41.67 (FY2012).  This option enables Soldiers to receive benefits to pay for books while preserving benefits for future use or transferability.

The Soldier must first have the approval of their chain of command. Then they need to make arrangements to return any issued supplies. Once these arrangements have been made, the interstate transfer worksheet must be completed with the assistance of the IST coordinator. When this is complete, the worksheet is sent to the gaining state's IST coordinator who will assist the service member in finding a new unit.

Soldiers can transfer whenever there is not a Stop/Loss in effect and have the approval of their chain of command.

You have not completed your transfer and been properly loaded into SIPDERS.

You must be sworn into the gaining state using NGB Form 22-5-R-E. Once this form is signed by the proper personnel, the IST coordinator will send it to the losing state to request the soldier's Personal Qualification Record (PQR). The IST coordinator will then send the 22-5-R-E and the PQR to SIDPERS for loading.

Many IST coordinators have a very high volume of transfers. Soldiers must be proactive in the transfer process. Don't wait to be called by the IST coordinator; call or contact them with any means available. Refer to the website for further assistance.

In most cases, bonus and stabilization contracts are honored in other states. Some bonuses are dependent on the Soldier’s MOS and finding an applicable unit. Research may be required. Stabilizations are usually honored as long as proper documentation is presented. Confirm this with the unit and the IST Coordinator.

It is the policy of the State of Texas to deny Soldiers that are not MOS qualified. All service members must complete basic and AIT in order to transfer. If a Soldier has not completed training, the State of Texas will allow them to courtesy drill with a local unit in the new state. Training certificates will be sent to their previous unit until the Soldier is ready to be courtesy shipped to complete training. Once in the AIT training pipeline, the IST process can be officially initiated.

The Interstate Transfer process can take between 14 and 90 days, depending on the initiative of the Soldier.

The service member must first have the approval of their chain of command. Then they need to make arrangements to return any issued supplies.

Service members can transfer whenever there is not a Stop/Loss in effect and have the approval of their chain of command.

You have not completed your transfer and been properly loaded into SIPDERS.

You must be sworn into the gaining state using NGB Form 337.

Many IST coordinators have a very high volume of transfers. Service members must be proactive in the transfer process. Don't wait to be called by the IST coordinator, call or contact them with any means available. Refer to the website for further assistance.

In most cases, bonus and stabilization contracts are honored in other states. Some bonuses are dependent on the service member's MOS and finding an applicable unit. Research may be required. Stabilizations are usually honored as long as proper documentation is presented. Confirm this with the unit and the IST Coordinator.

The Interstate Transfer process can take between 14 and 90 days, depending on the initiative of the servicemember.

We can pay up to 100% of your child's tuition.
Through multiple education benefits, the Guard can cover up to 100% of college tuition. Your child may also qualify for an additional $356 each month for expenses with the Montgomery GI Bill —plus up to another $350 with the Army National Guard Kicker . There are also Guard scholarships to help pay for school.

Your child can serve while they're in school.
With a commitment of one weekend a month plus two weeks of training in the summer, your son or daughter will be achieving a degree, earning Guard pay and life experience, while taking a huge bite out of their college costs.

Guard Soldiers are often better students.
Many young people actually do better in college after they have been through Guard training and gained additional discipline and maturity. This translates into better time management skills, better grades and better opportunities after graduation—both in the Texas Army National Guard and in civilian life.

The Texas Army National Guard teaches valuable job skills|
With several career fields and over 150 job specialties to choose from, your child will have no trouble finding a job specialty that fits their passion. And we don't just give them jobs—we pay them to learn skills like leadership, team building and self-discipline that will serve them in any career.

Your child can work and Serve in Texas Army National Guard at the same time
With the Guard's typical schedule of one weekend a month plus two weeks of training in the summer, Soldiers can easily maintain a civilian job while they serve. That means they can use their Texas Army National Guard training to land a good civilian job and bring home a second paycheck for part-time Guard service.

The Texas Army National Guard gives Soldiers an opportunity to network and earn benefits
Your son or daughter will be serving with other Soldiers in related career fields in their own community and state. They'll also be eligible for benefits like health and life insurance, discount shopping privileges on base, VA home loans and much more.

We will equip every Soldier physically and mentally
Your son or daughter will be in the best physical shape and be equipped to tackle even the toughest challenges. By attending the Texas Army National Guard's Recruit Sustainment Program, they'll have a good idea what to expect at Basic Training . And many students actually do much better in school after completing their training. You'll see how the skills and priorities they learn—like discipline and motivation—help them develop as individuals, team players and strong leaders.

Your Child may be asserting their independence
By showing an interest in serving, your son or daughter is telling you that they are ready to spread their wings. It may be tough to let them go, but with your support and the Guard’s training, they will make you proud.

The Texas Army National Guard trains Soldiers to take care of themselves
Texas Army National Guard Soldiers train alongside active duty troops. They learn the same combat skills, and use the same weapons and techniques. In other words, every Soldier is physically and mentally prepared for the challenge. And as their skills develop, they can qualify for specialized schools. From challenges like Airborne or Ranger school to language, leadership and management courses, the Guard will help your child develop strength, character and self reliance.

Most Texas Army National Guard training and deployments occur near home
Most weekend training takes place with a unit close to the Soldier’s home. And while Guard troops can be called up to serve overseas, they're more often mobilized to assist during domestic emergencies or natural disasters in or near the Soldier’s home state.

TA Requests must be APPROVED 10 days prior to start date.  Submit requests at least 14 days prior to the start date to allow processing time.

Application approval can take up to 3 weeks during the semester rush. In order to ensure your TA is approved prior to the class start date, apply as soon as possible but no more than 60 days prior to the course start date. To expedite the process and help guarantee your application is approved the first time you submit it, verify that your tuition and fees statement as well as your course schedule, that you upload, meets the criteria listed in account set up. 

  • If you are attending a school listed on the GoArmyEd Integrated Schools List, then the school will typically upload your degree plan/student agreement and tuition and fees statement or itemized bill for you. 
  • If you are attending a school that is not on the list above, then you will need to upload your degree plan/student agreement, course schedule, and tuition and fees statement (or itemized bill) via e-File in your GoArmyEd account.

In order to raise your GPA using self-funded classes, you must submit an application in GoArmyEd PRIOR TO THE CLASS START DATE in the same manner as if you were applying for TA.  Enter $0.00 in the tuition cost section.  If you do not complete this process, GoArmyEd cannot incorporate your grades to increase your GPA.  If you need further assistance please call (512) 782-5515 and speak with a guidance counselor.  Once your GPA is raised to above 2.0, full TA privileges will be reinstated.

If you have questions about your account, TA, GoArmyEd, application status, etc., submit a Help Desk ticket in GoArmyEd.  Help Desk tickets get priority- response time is usually 24 hours. You are also welcome to call the Texas Army National Guard Education Office at (512) 782-5515.  Select the option for federal tuition assistance or guidance counselor.