Texas National Guard teams up with Austin’s National Charity League, Inc. to help women vets find jobs

Daniel Esquivel, a designer from Project Runway's Season 11, gives advice on a potential career outfit to Amanda Negrete at the Military Women in Transition event here at Camp Mabry Feb. 16, 2014.
Daniel Esquivel, a designer from Project Runway's Season 11, gives advice on a potential career outfit to Amanda Negrete at the Military Women in Transition event here at Camp Mabry Feb. 16, 2014. Esquivel donated his time and gave away a career outfit he designed to an attendee. Chapters from the Austin area National Charity League, LLC., Texas Military Forces and Austin Human Resources Management Association worked together to host the career event for military women and dependents.

Story by: 2nd Lt. Alicia Lacy

 

CAMP MABRY, Texas - Be proactive, be prepared and take advantage of all the resources available.

As a recruiter who works to help veterans find jobs, Leslie Goodman said that’s advice she wants all military members to know and practice when transitioning from the military to the civilian workforce.

Goodman was one of several employers, recruiters and organization representatives at the Texas National Guard and National Charity League, Inc.’s Military Women in Transition event Feb. 16, 2014, at Camp Mabry.

Organizers of the event touched on several aspects of the job search and career enhancement process, which included social media, resume reviews and mock interviews.

Goodman said one of the biggest challenges for military members transitioning to a civilian career is that there aren’t enough military occupational specialties that directly translate into a civilian occupation.

“They have the discipline and training, but not the job skills,” Goodman added. “It’s difficult to take a service member who worked with artillery to apply those skills to a career in the civilian sector.”

Although some career fields in the military don’t directly convert into a civilian career, the basic skills gained from military service can give veterans an advantage.

Lisa Young, Annie Worthen, and Jennifer Grier, all U.S. Army veterans, said they can capitalize on the foundational skills they learned in the military - discipline, attention to detail, how to remain focused on the task, and always completing the mission.

Those are all qualities employers look for, Goodman said.

Goodman also stressed that service members should always be prepared when interviewing.

Many job seekers don’t know to research the company, the company culture, or the interviewer prior to going to a job interview, Goodman said. By doing their homework, jobseekers can have an edge.

In addition to doing research and planning for the future, Goodman said it is important for service members to take advantage of the programs the military offers its members like the G.I. Bill and eArmyU.

Worthen had the opportunity to perform a mock interview with Goodman, where she said she learned helpful information that can aid in her own career search.

Worthen was pleased with the event and the honest feedback she received.

“This event is great because the information they’re giving us, we didn’t know,” Worthen said.

Members from the Austin chapters of the league, Texas Military Forces Family Support Services and Operation Homefront conceived the idea for the event after a brainstorming session. As a result, the group recognized a lack of transitioning services for military women.

“Our organization has a national initiative, Service from the Heart, focused on supporting military members and their families,” said Julie Ballard, Hills of Austin chapter president. “There were transition services for men, but none that focused on the unique needs of women.”

After spending 12 years in the Army, Young said she appreciated the clothing closet and the opportunity to speak with hair and makeup experts.

“We’re so used to wearing a uniform everyday, so they’re teaching us what to wear,” Young said.

The clothing closet allowed attendees to choose from new or gently-used business attire and receive advice from hair and makeup professionals, which featured Daniel Esquivel, a designer from season 11 of “Project Runway” and season 3 of “Project Runway All Stars.”

Esquivel, whose father served in the U.S. Air Force, said he was happy to give back to the community.

Esquivel gave fashion advice and raffled one of his designs to an attendee, which will be tailored to fit her.

Organizers said the event was successful because it presented options for women veterans and dependents, as well as providing an opportunity for teens in the league to engage with and serve military members - something that doesn't happen often.

“We can see this happening again,” Ballard said. “But we will always bend toward the greatest need.”

Fort Hood honors Texas National Guard maintenance shop

Sgt. Michael Shelby, Maneuver Area Training Equipment Site (MATES), Texas Army National Guard, works on a heavy equipment transporter, while using a drip pan to maintain leaking gear oil.
Sgt. Michael Shelby, Maneuver Area Training Equipment Site (MATES), Texas Army National Guard, works on a heavy equipment transporter, while using a drip pan to maintain leaking gear oil. Drip pans are one way MATES enforces environmental policies. MATES was recognized more than 48 other battalion size or larger units located at Fort Hood by Fort Hood's Directorate of Public Works for outstanding environmental stewardship Feb. 11, 2014. Fort Hood, Texas.

Story by: Capt. Martha Nigrelle

 FORT HOOD, Texas - The Texas Army National Guard Maneuver Area Training Equipment Site, or MATES, was honored  Feb. 11 at Fort Hood during the Hood Hero award ceremony, for outstanding environmental stewardship. 

MATES was recognized over 48 other battalion size or larger units located at Fort Hood by Fort Hood’s Directorate of  Public Works (DPW) explained Glenn Collier, Environmental Protection Specialist at Fort Hood. The DPW conducts regular  environmental inspections at these maintenance facilities. Based on results from these inspections, environmental  protection specialists determine who will be recognized for outstanding environmental stewardship.

 “MATES was selected as a result of a continued commitment to upholding environmental standards and policies. They  don’t just get cleaned up and look pretty for inspections, they stay that way all the time,” Collier said.

 Don Melton, Regional Environmental Specialist for the Texas Military Forces, explained that the environmental management  system follows policies and guidance set at the federal, state, and local levels. 

 “This high standard ensures consistency in the program. The Soldiers recycle almost everything,” said Melton. 

 It’s about a commitment to the environmental program, visibility on the program, and making good environmental habits  simple and easy to maintain explained Texas Army National Guard Col. Stanley Goloboff, Deputy Chief of Staff, Logistics. 

 “This shop is an example of every one of our [Texas Army National Guard] maintenance facilities. The same level of  environmental stewardship that is going on at MATES is going on in all of our [124] facilities,” continued Goloboff. 

The practice of recycling and disposing of waste immediately is what keeps these shops so clean explained Chief Warrant Office 2 Ryan Ramsey, the MATES environmental officer in charge. This prevents shops from accumulating waste, resulting in a clean working environment.

This isn’t the first time that MATES has been recognized for outstanding environmental stewardship.

In 2012, MATES received the highest state environmental award, the HONDO award, for excellence in environmental stewardship said Texas Army National Guard Maj. John Hutka, MATES superintendent. 

According to Hutka, National Guard units outside of Texas have also reached out to MATES as an example for good environmental practices.

The MATES team works hard at being good environmental stewards, but the main focus is always their mission. They maintain over 1600 vehicles for the Texas Army National Guard, servicing vehicles from brigades all over the state. Because of their unique location next to Fort Hood’s largest training area, they also prepare and issue necessary equipment to both Texas units, and any other guard or reserve unit that comes to Fort Hood for training. Should an active duty unit need assistance for their training mission, MATES is there to assist them as well.

“Our facility is like a hub. If anyone ever needs to turn something in, we take it. We never turn anyone away – reserve, civilian, or active,” said Sgt. Kisha Mathurin, environmental noncommissioned officer for MATES. “I am very proud of the team here and all of their hard work.”

Brig. Gen. Douglas Gabram, Deputy Commanding General 1st Cavalry Division, and keynote speaker for ceremony, said about the awardees, “these are the people who improve the quality of life for all of us at Fort Hood.”

The teamwork at MATES, their commitment to the environment, and their commitment to their fellow service members, both guard and active is key to the shop.

“We have a very good team over here at Fort Hood,” Ramsey explained. “We help out other units who come here to North Fort Hood. We give them that guard hospitality.”

National Guard senior enlisted adviser visits Texas National Guardsmen

National Guard Bureau senior enlisted leader Command Chief Master Sgt. Mitchell Brush takes time to meet with Staff Sgt. Nayda Troche, center, and Spc. Jennifer Cubero, Texas Medical Command, Texas Army National Guard, after his town hall meeting held at Camp Mabry in Austin, Texas, Feb. 9, 2014.
National Guard Bureau senior enlisted leader Command Chief Master Sgt. Mitchell Brush takes time to meet with Staff Sgt. Nayda Troche, center, and Spc. Jennifer Cubero, Texas Medical Command, Texas Army National Guard, after his town hall meeting held at Camp Mabry in Austin, Texas, Feb. 9, 2014. Brush discussed the value the National Guard brings to the nation, both abroad and at home, and the importance of looking out for each other to help reduce the numbers of suicide within the ranks. Brush also opened up the floor to questions or concerns by service members in the audience. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Malcolm McClendon)

Story by: Sgt. 1st Class Malcolm McClendon

 AUSTIN, Texas – The National Guard’s senior enlisted adviser, Command Chief Master Sgt. Mitchell O. Brush, held a  Town Hall meeting for Texas National Guardsmen at Camp Mabry in Austin, Texas, Feb. 9, 2014.

 Brush discussed various topics varied from suicide prevention to force structure and specifically highlighted the vital role  the National Guard plays both home and abroad.

 “Since 9/11, 800,000 deployments have been filled by National Guardsmen,” said Brush. “We total only 453,000 both Army  and Air National Guardsmen [at any given time], meaning multiple deployments for some.”

 The senior enlisted advisor explained to the Guardsmen in attendance that these deployments differ from those of the  active duty forces.

 “When we deploy, we cost the same as an active duty component,” Brush said. “However, when we’re done, we go  home; we go back to our communities. This makes us cheaper.”

 Brush is referring to the National Guards’ ranks, composed of part-time service members who have full-time civilian jobs  and careers. This allows the force to have ready trained citizen-soldiers and airmen without having employ them on a full-  time active status.

 In a time of budgets cuts and reduction in missions, Brush believes this is the Guard’s key message to help the fight for  funding for its programs. 

 He reassured the Texas National Guardsmen that this is a top priority for him and Gen. Frank J. Grass, Chief of the National Guard Bureau. 

“Let us worry about force structure,” Brush said. “You guys out here need to concentrate on what you do really well.”

Brush shared a conversation he had with Grass about things that keep him up at night. Instead of responding with budgets and sequestrations, as Brush had assumed, Grass responded with, “Mother Nature.”

“A catastrophic event that will take out three-quarters of the United States,” Brush said. “This is what he worries about.”

The National Guard plays a vital role in support of civil authorities during emergency situations. These can be anything from hurricanes, floods, ice storms and even chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear attacks.

Just one more thing that makes the Guard so valuable, Brush believes.

Spc. Jennifer Cubero, Texas Medical Command, Texas Army National Guard, attended the town hall and appreciated the visit from Brush.

“The fact that we have people at the national levels fighting for us is comforting,” Cubero said. “Regardless of budgets, I feel that they are trying to let the nation know what we do and what we bring to the fight.”

County resolution recognizes Texas Guardsmen

Bastrop County Judge Paul Pape reads a proclamation recognizing the soldiers and airmen competing in the Texas National Guard Best Warrior Competition at Camp Swift, Bastrop, Texas, on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014.
Bastrop County Judge Paul Pape reads a proclamation recognizing the soldiers and airmen competing in the Texas National Guard Best Warrior Competition at Camp Swift, Bastrop, Texas, on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014.

Story by: Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Griego

 BASTROP, Texas - National Guard supporters at the Bastrop County Commissioners Court issued a proclamation Feb. 8,  2014, in support of the Best Warrior Competition, held annually at Camp Swift. The installation, located near the city of  Bastrop in central Texas, hosts the joint, statewide event each February to recognize the fittest and most professional  Guardsmen within the Texas Military Forces.

 "We're very excited about this competition being here," said Hon. Paul Pape, county judge for Bastrop County. "We believe  in the mission of the National Guard. We are so thankful that men and women in the National Guard are here to protect our  country and to serve our country to promote freedom here and abroad."

 Pape, who read the resolution just prior to the confidence course event, welcomed the competition and all Texas  Guardsmen to the county and offered further support in the form of a fund-raising golf tournament benefiting the  competitors.

 "It's our way of saying thank you," said Pape. "I hope that they can go back to their homes in Texas and know that we  here in central Texas appreciate what they're doing."

 The day was celebrated by regional and national figures within the military community, including Chief Master Sgt. Mitchell  Brush, the National Guard Bureau's senior enlisted adviser.

"When we go out and get a chance to see these events hosted in our states," said Brush, "the biggest thing that we're looking for is support from the community because we certainly can't do any of this without our communities and our families supporting us."

The competition featured 16 non-commissioned officers and 11 junior enlisted Guardsmen engaging a three-day gauntlet of events, including land navigation, weapons qualification, a six-mile road march, the confidence course, an appearance review board, and a written essay.

"We're very unique as the National Guard," said Brush, speaking of the two branches that make up the component. "We fight fires together, we fight floods together. It's great that we can meet today and build those relationships instead of when we're in a crisis situation where we don't have time to make those introductions."

Strong working relationships are important to Texas Guardsmen, where the airmen and soldiers seldom have opportunities to train alongside each other. Events like this bridge the gap between the branches and reinforce the common ground in our missions.

"It's a good thing for Texas as a whole," said Don Nicholas, the district director for Texas Representative Ralph Sheffield. "People come from around the area, around the state, to witness this important event that takes place here."

The resolution demonstrates a commitment of support from the county only an hour from Austin's Camp Swift, headquarters for the Texas Air and Army National Guards. By celebrating the competition that highlights Texas' finest, the county recognizes the sacrifices and duty of the state's men and women in uniform.

"It gives the public an opportunity to see that our military is trained and prepared," said State Rep. Tim Kleinschmidt, "and it's not just sitting behind a desk somewhere."

"When the [judge] comes out here on a day that's overcast, cold and gray," said Brush, "and he wants to read a proclamation declaring that today is best warrior day, it just fills my heart with pride to see that we've got such amazing support from our civilian counterparts."

4th Regiment - Texas Military Forces have two new soldiers

Story by: CW2 Janet Schmelzer, PAO, 4th Regiment

Posted: 07-FEB-2014

PFC Andy Ritter and PV2 Amanda Ritter Join at the Same Time

(Left to right) Chief Warrant Officer James Smith swears in PFC Andy Ritter into the Texas National Guard and PV2 Amanda Ritter into the Texas State Guard on January 5, 2014. Photo by CW2 Janet Schmelzer, PAO, 4th Regiment.
(Left to right) Chief Warrant Officer James Smith swears in PFC Andy Ritter into the Texas National Guard and PV2 Amanda Ritter into the Texas State Guard on January 5, 2014. Photo by CW2 Janet Schmelzer, PAO, 4th Regiment.

On January 5, 2014, husband PFC Andy Ritter and wife PV2 Amanda Ritter were sworn into two different components of the Texas Military Forces.  PFC Ritter joined the Texas Army National Guard and PV2 Amanda Ritter joined the Texas State Guard (TXSG), 2nd Battalion.  Chief Warrant Officer James Smith, 4th Regiment, TXSG, swore in the two soldiers.
PFC Ritter served for three and a half years in the U. S. Army in the 3rd Infantry Division at Fort Benning, Georgia.  He was a Bradley driver and Cavalry Scout.  He is from El Campo, Texas.

PV2 Ritter decided that she wanted to “serve my state and be a part of a real life experience” as a soldier in the TXSG.  Ritter is from San Antonio, Texas.  She is presently attending the University of Texas at Arlington and plans on applying for the Tuition benefit offered by the Texas State Guard to complete her degree. The Ritters have been married for two and a half years and live in Arlington, Texas.

Texas Military Forces stargazing - a modern day Lewis and Clark Expedition

A sextant, the same tool used by the Lewis and Clark Expedition in the early 1800s to map the western United States, and is still being used today by the Texas Military Forces (TXMF). David Rolbiecki, Chief of survey for the TXMF, uses this sextant to obtain precise measurements of the earth.
A sextant, the same tool used by the Lewis and Clark Expedition in the early 1800s to map the western United States, and is still being used today by the Texas Military Forces (TXMF). David Rolbiecki, Chief of survey for the TXMF, uses this sextant to obtain precise measurements of the earth. Rolbiecki is hoping to use his research to feed the National Geodetic Survey, and ultimately help to improve elevation measurements for the Global Positioning System, or GPS. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Capt. Martha C. Nigrelle/Released)

Story by: Capt. Martha Nigrelle

 
CAMP MABRY, Texas - In 1804, President Thomas Jefferson enlisted Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to lead an  expedition across the western frontier to the Pacific Ocean, to “record the face of the country.” As history books can  attest, the Corps of Discovery Expedition was a success. Today, some of the same methods Lewis and Clark used in the  1800s to map the new territory, and the future of the United States, are being utilized in the Texas Military Forces (TXMF).

 David Rolbiecki, Registered Professional Land Surveyor of the State of Texas and Chief of Survey for the TXMF oversees  land surveying for the organization and introduced the classic practice of geodetic astronomy, using the sun, moon and  stars to conduct measurements of the earth, at Camp Mabry, in Austin, Texas.

 According to records at the Library of Congress, Lewis and Clark created the first maps of the mid west and western  portions of the United States. They started at Lake Michigan and extended out to the Pacific Ocean. In order to properly  chart these maps, Lewis, using geodetic astronomy, took astronomic observations (looking at the stars) along key points,  thus enabling him to ascertain latitude and longitude and create a more accurate map. 

 With online maps, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), and google earth, one might think this practice is no longer  necessary.

 Rolbiecki explained that the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), an agency that falls under National Oceanic and  Atmospheric Administration, and works with the Department of Defense’s Global Positioning System (GPS), to provide the  framework for all GPS positioning activities in the U.S. is extremely accurate when measuring horizontal distances, but when looking at GPS derived elevation data, GPS is not quite as accurate. NGS is looking to improve this, using astronomic observations to augment GPS observations used in gravity research. 

Shooting from what looks like a concrete post situated in the middle of a field at Camp Mabry, Rolbiecki and Mark Hinojosa, a TXMF Land Survey Technician, are using replicas of the same equipment used by Lewis and Clark. Using their equipment and methods, Rolbiecki is able to look to the stars for accurate latitude and longitude readings. 

And the concrete post - a permanent astro-geodetic pier which is an extremely accurate and stable platform to use for astro-geodetic observations.

“The purpose of the pier is to add a permanent, high-accuracy legacy monument to the existing Camp Mabry survey control network,” said Rolbiecki. The astro-geodetic pier provides a platform for precise astronomic observations using optical theodolites, and training in celestial observations using a marine sextant - all tools of the geodetic practice.

“Establishing the astro-pier at Camp Mabry benefits any planning and design endeavors [for the TXMF]. It also allows an opportunity to learn how to perform astrometric observations and practice celestial navigation,” said Kristin Mt Joy, Cultural Resource Program manager for TXMF and a registered professional archeologist.

Rolbiecki first joined the Army in 1982 as a geodetic surveyor and spent time surveying for the Army in Virginia, Hawaii, and Maine before coming back to Texas. He is currently on the board of editors for the Journal of Surveying Engineering and is also a chief warrant officer for the Texas Army National Guard. For his guard duties, he is a planner, but when he comes to work at Camp Mabry, Rolbiecki is known as the man who is passionate about astro-geodetic work.

“Mr. Rolbiecki is very smart and sometimes it is hard to translate his knowledge and skill set! But cultural resources has learned a lot since partnering with his team,” said Mt Joy.

Rolbiecki’s unique skill set has benefited both the land survey department, as well as, the cultural resources department of the TXMF.

“The Cultural Resources Program has been partnering with the land survey team to record historic features across Camp Mabry's historic district. The astro-pier established by Mr. Rolbiecki not only provides a permanent station for geospatial reference, it has allowed the cultural resources staff to learn about how mapping and orientations were derived with historic equipment,” said Maj. Richard Martinez, environmental manager for the TXMF. “At an upcoming archaeological conference in 2014, military archaeologists and academics will have an opportunity to see demonstrations of orienting at the astro-pier.“ 

“[Astronomic] observations on land are obsolete due to high-accuracy GPS,” explained Rolbiecki. “I still practice this science and art.”

According to the NGS official website, the vertical data they are looking for would provide elevation accuracy within a two centimeters level from almost any location in the U.S., improving location information to the millions of people who use GPS every day. In order to complete this project it is necessary to measure the stars. NGS is actively recruiting people who can conduct these celestial surveys.

Rolbiecki is hoping to be one of those people.

In the mean time, Rolbiecki set up the astro-geodetic pier, or control station, on Camp Mabry in order to have a precise location from which to measure the sun, the stars, and the moon. This paired with his sextant, artificial horizon and chronometer, the same tools that Lewis used 200 years ago, has set Rolbiecki up to record the face of Texas for the future.