Posts in Category: Texas Army National Guard

TXNG Soldiers help save life on border

A soldier from the 36th Infantry Division, Texas Army National Guard observes a section of the Rio Grande River at sunset.
A soldier from the 36th Infantry Division, Texas Army National Guard observes a section of the Rio Grande River at sunset. He is serving at the Texas-Mexico border in support of Operation Strong Safety. (U.S. Army photo by Maj. Randall Stillinger)

 

 Story By Maj. Randall Stillinger

 WESLACO, Texas – The quick response of three Texas Army National Guard soldiers on Sept. 11, 2014, helped save  the life of a local Texan.
 
The soldiers, who were manning an observation post as part of Operation Strong Safety, administered emergency first aid to an injured man after he accidentally cut himself while clearing brush along the river.
 
At one point during their shift, a pickup truck came speeding toward the soldiers’ observation post. 
“At first we thought they might be runners,” one soldier remarked. 
 
The driver then jumped out of the vehicle and started yelling, “He’s cut! He’s cut!” 
 
The soldiers, who asked not to be identified for the security of themselves and their families, thought this might be a training scenario. 
 
“I thought someone was testing us,” said one of the soldiers, “but then the driver opened the passenger door and we saw the blood. We knew it was real.” 
 
The shift leader for the observation post immediately jumped into action, grabbing a tourniquet from his first aid kit. He placed the tourniquet just below the arm pit, but it didn’t completely stop the bleeding. A second tourniquet was required lower down on the arm to completely stop the bleeding. 
 
The driver was also showing the initial signs of trauma shock, which prompted assistance from a second soldier.
 
As this was happening, a radio call went to the Texas Department of Public Safety for medical assistance. A medic from the Texas Army National Guard also arrived on
scene to provide additional help. 
 
While the others were providing care, one of the original three soldiers noticed a Mission Police Department vehicle nearby and ran to flag him down. An ambulance arrived not too long after that and the man was transferred to the nearest emergency room. 
 
Although none of the three soldiers were Combat Medics, each of them had received specialized training as Combat Life Savers and had trained specifically for similar scenarios. The three soldiers included an infantryman, a heavy vehicle repairer and a heavy vehicle operator. 
 
The shift leader, who had previously deployed to Afghanistan in 2012, said he didn’t think he would be doing something like this for a U.S. citizen. 
“I’m just glad we were there,” he said. “If not, he probably would have bled out due to the amount of blood he had lost.”
 
The shift supervisor said that he was proud of these soldiers “because they didn’t panic.” 
 
“They took care of the situation without senior leadership being there,” he said. “It feels good to know that I have soldiers like this on point.” 
 
When asked if he considered himself a hero, one soldier said, “I was just doing my job, sir.”
 
The injured man is doing well and is expected to make a full recovery. 

 

Interagency training exercise benefits from Citizen Soldier presence

Story by: Sgt. Suzanna Carter

Posted: September 21, 2014

Sgt. Suzanne Carter Air Force Capt. Laura Lokey, an optometrist with 149th Medical Group, 149th Fighter Wing, checks Miguel Gomez's eyes on day four of Operation Lone Star at Manzano Middle School in Brownsville, Texas, Aug. 7, 2014. This was the first year that full vision services were available at the Brownsville medical point of distribution during this annual, five-day, medical and emergency preparedness exercise. More than 600 patients received eye exams and prescription glasses through Remote Area Medical, the Knoxville, Tenn.-based organization that provides the equipment for the exams and fills glasses prescriptions on-site, and Texas Military Forces during Operation Lone Star 2013. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Suzanne Carter/Released)
Sgt. Suzanne Carter
Air Force Capt. Laura Lokey, an optometrist with 149th Medical Group, 149th Fighter Wing, checks Miguel Gomez's eyes on day four of Operation Lone Star at Manzano Middle School in Brownsville, Texas, Aug. 7, 2014. This was the first year that full vision services were available at the Brownsville medical point of distribution during this annual, five-day, medical and emergency preparedness exercise. More than 600 patients received eye exams and prescription glasses through Remote Area Medical, the Knoxville, Tenn.-based organization that provides the equipment for the exams and fills glasses prescriptions on-site, and Texas Military Forces during Operation Lone Star 2013. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Suzanne Carter/Released)

BROWNSVILLE, Texas – Texas Military Forces, in partnership with state and local authorities, gained valuable training experience from the 16th iteration of Operation Lone Star in the Rio Grande Valley and Laredo, Texas, Aug. 4-8, 2014.

Texas State Guard, a component of the Texas Military Forces, in particular, put into practice the second step of its shelter, recover and return emergency response plan during this annual, medical and emergency preparedness exercise that covered five sites throughout South Texas.

"[Civil authorities] would have us come in, work with them, and we would run the operation of the shelter, managing the clients within it, meeting their needs, keeping them safe in a disaster situation," said Capt. Vicky Nunn, 39th Composite Regiment, 1st Battalion, Texas State Guard. "[Meeting client needs] is what you'll see here. It's recovery training."

The interagency collaboration necessary to activate Operation Lone Star, one of the largest medical and emergency preparedness missions in the country, benefits from the inherent value in utilizing the Texas Military Forces to serve the citizens of Texas.

"It's a good value for the State of Texas because as Citizen Soldiers, we're able to be activated, come down, provide the care, and then go back to our civilian jobs after that," said Army Capt. Adam Wood, a field surgeon with Texas Medical Command, Texas Army National Guard. "So the amount of resources and time and money it takes to use us in that tactical situation is significantly less than it would be to use the active duty side in that same tactical setup."

Brig. Gen. Sean A. Ryan, commander of the 71st Troop Command, Texas Army National Guard, also emphasized the role of the Texas State Guard in the planning and implementation of this collaborative training exercise.

"We have more relied on our Texas State Guard to the point where we're pretty much ready to turn it over to [them] to do all the planning, the preparation, the training" for Operation Lone Star, Ryan said. "I think it has really helped us to exercise … the Texas State Guard to really do their mission. They are a huge part of what we do during a natural disaster."

Texas Army, Air and State Guard involvement in Operation Lone Star also fosters vital relationships with state and local agencies that they would work with in an emergency situation.

"This is just another incident in a different county with different relationships with other authorities," Nunn said. "Because we may be deployed here at some point if they need us, I think it is very important to build those contacts."

Service members often form relationships with patients who return to Operation Lone Star every year for the critical health services that are provided.

"Some of our Soldiers look forward to coming back here year after year to see individuals who might be returning and to see the updates in those families and how their children have grown and how their lives have changed," said Army Maj. Jerri Gates, senior behavior health officer with Texas Medical Command, Texas Army National Guard. 

Spc. Marcus Fernandez, 39th Composite Regiment, 1st Battalion, Texas State Guard, said that interacting with patients was all part of the training experience that prepares him and other service members for future emergency response situations.

"We see, throughout the week, so many different things that if we have to open a shelter, anybody that comes to the door, we should be able to handle it because we have this experience," he said. 

Area residents who visited Operation Lone Star expressed appreciation for the services that were available through the collaborative training exercise.

"Seeing the men and women in uniform is an awesome blessing, because everyone is walking around with a smile, very happy," said Zulema Silva, a Brownsville resident. "It's just a happy feeling to see y'all here, helping us and providing us with services that we otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford. Again I appreciate everything that you all do for us in the community."

Interagency medical exercise garners praise, international audience

Story by: Sgt Suzanna Carter

Posted: September 19, 2014

Sgt. Suzanne Carter Representatives of Chilean military and a Chilean national emergency response agency examine samples of sugar contents in popular beverages at a health awareness booth during Operation Lone Star in Laredo, Texas, Aug. 6, 2014. The officials visited Operation Lone Star to see how multiple agencies collaborate to plan and implement this annual medical and emergency preparedness exercise. The Operation Lone Star partnership between Texas Military Forces, Texas Department of State Health Services and other state and local agencies has provided much needed health care services to more than 100,000 Laredo and Rio Grande Valley residents since 1999. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Suzanne Carter)
Sgt. Suzanne Carter
Representatives of Chilean military and a Chilean national emergency response agency examine samples of sugar contents in popular beverages at a health awareness booth during Operation Lone Star in Laredo, Texas, Aug. 6, 2014. The officials visited Operation Lone Star to see how multiple agencies collaborate to plan and implement this annual medical and emergency preparedness exercise. The Operation Lone Star partnership between Texas Military Forces, Texas Department of State Health Services and other state and local agencies has provided much needed health care services to more than 100,000 Laredo and Rio Grande Valley residents since 1999. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Suzanne Carter)

LAREDO, Texas –Texas Military Forces with international, state, and local officials, celebrated the successful collaboration among multiple agencies to plan and implement Operation Lone Star 2014 during a ceremony at the medical point of distribution (MPOD) in Laredo, Texas, Aug. 6, 2014.

Brig. Gen. Sean A. Ryan, Texas Army National Guard deputy commander, senior members of the Chilean military and a Chilean emergency response organization, and other officials toured the medical and emergency preparedness exercise site following the ceremony to see the cooperation among the various organizations represented.

"We're directly working with the Department of State Health Services … the state judges that you see, the superintendents, the leadership of a lot of the emergency services that we would be interacting with in the communities," in the event of an emergency or disaster, Ryan said. "[These partnerships have] just gotten better every year."

Chilean military and emergency response representatives visited the Laredo MPOD to gain a greater understanding of interagency collaboration for disaster response as part of a standing partnership between the Texas Military Forces and Chile.

"Operation Lone Star is what we consider a remote type of emergency disaster response scenario," said Air Force Lt. Col. Daniel Rodriguez, the bilateral affairs officer who coordinated the Chilean representatives' visit through the U.S. Embassy in Santiago, Chile. "With all the earthquakes and recent wildfires they've had in Chile, a lot of their areas are considered to be remote. So they're just kind of taking some lessons learned and doing some subject-matter exchanges with the personnel at Operation Lone Star who have been doing this for years."

While Operation Lone Star is a valuable training exercise for medical and emergency preparedness, it also provides much needed medical services to underserved residents in Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley. These services include vision, hearing, and diabetes screenings, immunizations and physical health assessments. Five MPODs in Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley offered these and additional.

Texas' civil support team trains for proficiency validation

members of the 6th Civil Support Team, based in Austin, Texas, participate in a response exercise with the McAllen and Pharr Fire Departments in McAllen, Texas, Sept. 4, 2014.
In this image released by Joint Task Force 136 (Maneuver Enhancement Brigade), members of the 6th Civil Support Team, based in Austin, Texas, participate in a response exercise with the McAllen and Pharr Fire Departments in McAllen, Texas, Sept. 4, 2014. Real-world, scenario-based training like this reinforces working relationships with civil authorities and ensures the members of the emergency response community are prepared when disaster strikes. (Photo by Lt. Col. William Phillips)

 

 Story by Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Griego
 
 PHARR, Texas - “The more we can train with the people we are going to work with,” said Air Guard Capt. Jason  Harrison,  “the better the response goes.”

 In the Army, “train as you fight” is a time-tested maxim. For the members of the Texas National Guard’s 6th Civil Support  Team, whose mission is chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear testing, identification, and monitoring, it means that  every scenario should be treated as a dangerous incident in need of immediate attention. They demonstrated this  mentality for two days in Pharr, Texas, when they teamed up with the Pharr and McAllen Fire Departments for  interagency collective training simulating hazardous contaminations of local sites.

 “The day's exercise incorporated multiple facets of CBRN/HAZMAT response,” said Harrison, who serves as a survey  team leader within the 6th CST, “including an exercise scenario involving malicious use of radioactive material, hazardous  chemicals, and life-threatening biological samples.”

 The training, which took place Sept. 3-4, found the team utilizing warehouse structures in Pharr to simulate an urban  environment where such incidents might take place. By incorporating their civilian counterparts from the local fire  departments into the training, the CST reinforced their role as supporters of civil authorities when disaster strikes.

 “These types of joint exercises allow for both entities to practice real-life scenarios with civilian counterparts and Texas  Army National Guard units,” said Army Guard Maj. Chol Chong, the deputy commander for the 6th CST. “The end state of  this practice exercise allows for both entities to understand each other’s capabilities and to rapidly mitigate any risks to  the civilian population.”

The Guard’s partners within the McAllen Fire Department additionally used the exercise as a training opportunity for their hazardous materials technician class.

“They are conducting a HAZMAT course and brought all of the students over,” said Army Guard Lt. Col. William Phillips, commander of the 6th CST. “The HAZMAT Tech class observers stayed for five hours and received full access to all of our processes and procedures, and sent observers on entry.”

This entry refers to how the different units engage a hazardous zone, using established guidelines for order, timing, and communication.

“The Pharr and McAllen FDs performed the initial entry, as would usually happen on scene, and back-briefed the CST on what they located,” said Harrison. “Every real-world emergency that the CST has responded to during my four-plus years on the team has seen us paired with local responders. For example, we performed joint entries during the initial response to the West, Texas, disaster.”

This training exercise additionally served as a precursor to the 6th CST’s Training Proficiency Exercise scheduled for Sept. 25. That culminating event, validated by U.S. Army North, is a regular training requirement for certification to conduct the civil support team mission, and must be completed every 18 months.

“The system works,” said Harrison. “We are a customer service entity and enjoy doing what we were built for, civil support.”

The 6th CST conducts frequent training events like this throughout the state, regularly working alongside their civilian counterparts and developing strong interagency relationships. These preparations and relationships are key to their continued proficiency and instrumental to the success of their mission.

“It was a long day,” said Phillips, “but very valuable.”

TXNG supports multinational exercise

Sgt. Marlene Duncan, 100th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Texas Army National Guard, right, role plays as a civilian media reporter during Operation Saber Junction held at Hohenfels in Nuremburg, Germany, Sept. 10, 2014.
Sgt. Marlene Duncan, 100th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Texas Army National Guard, right, role plays as a civilian media reporter during Operation Saber Junction held at Hohenfels in Nuremberg, Germany, Sept. 10, 2014. The 100th MPAD supported 17 countries, including the U.S., with realistic civilian media coverage; giving leadership a better understanding of how to work with civilian media in an operational environment. (U.S. Army National Guard photo courtesy of the 100th MPAD)

 

 Story by Sgt. Adrian Shelton

  NUREMBERG, Germany (Sept. 12, 2014) - Public Affairs soldiers from 100th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Texas  Army National Guard, in Austin, Texas, traveled to Nuremberg, Germany to capture the activities of thousands of troops in  a joint exercise called Saber Junction, August 23 – Sept. 12, 2014.

 Nearly 6,000 troops representing 17 countries participated in the multi-week international exercise at U.S. Army Garrison  Hohenfels in Nuremberg. Often times, militaries from around the world work together to support a larger operation, such as  seen during Operation Enduring Freedom. At the height of Operation Enduring Freedom, more than 20 different countries’  militaries joined forces to support operations and peace keeping missions. This type of multi-national training is designed to  prepare militaries for large-scale contingency operations.

 MPAD soldiers role-played as civilian media personnel to provide commanders from each country’s military; an understanding of how civilian journalism can shape the perception of war in public.

“It’s the best opportunity I’ve had so far in my military public affairs training to improve my skills at writing and taking photos,” said Spc. Michael Giles, print journalist with the MPAD. “It’s also given me a great opportunity to see how the public affairs structure works and why it’s an important part of military operations.”

    Each day the service members headed into “The Box,” where role players, located in numerous mock cities provided information on military operations to the MPAD with the help of German translators. 

    “They created this world that we got to be a part of and have an impact based on what we reported,” said Army Sgt. Suzanne Carter, another print journalist with the MPAD. “The best part for me was figuring out their characters and who would support my side of the scenario.”

    Annual training normally lasts only two weeks. But with an extra week, Army 1st Sgt. Merrion Lasonde directed her Soldiers to switch jobs for a day in order to become proficient in both skill sets. This meant the broadcast journalists would do the work required of print journalists and vice versa. 

    “In my mind, it was necessary,” Lasonde said. “They would find their groove and ultimately make the mission a success in their own individual way.”
    Exercise leadership thought the MPAD provided an accurate representation of the media in a war zone.

    “It’s greatly contributing to presenting an immersive picture of the operating environment for the Rotational Training Unit,” said James Dorough-Lewis Jr., the Operational Environment Training Specialist with the U.S. Army at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center (JMRC).

    “We love having Reserve and National Guard elements come out to cover these exercises,” said Mark Van Treuren, media advisor, JMRC Public Affairs Office Operations Team. “We can’t do this without you.”
 
Army Sgt. Josiah Pugh contributed to story.

Apache Battalion receives Valorous Unit Award

Maj. Gen. James K. "Red" Brown, commander of the 36th Infantry Division, and Col. Rick Adams place the Valorous Unit Award on the "colors" of the 1-149th Attack-Reconnaissance Battalion during a ceremony held at Ellington Field.
Maj. Gen. James K. "Red" Brown, commander of the 36th Infantry Division, and Col. Rick Adams place the Valorous Unit Award on the "colors" of the 1-149th Attack-Reconnaissance Battalion during a ceremony held at Ellington Field. The unit was awarded this high honor for exceptional performance during Operation Iraqi Freedom. The 1-149th is an AH-64 "Apache" battalion assigned to the 36th Combat Aviation Brigade and earned the award for their 2006-2007 deployment to Iraq. (U.S. Army photo by Maj. Randall Stillinger/Released)

 

The 1st of the 149th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion (ARB) was recently awarded the Valorous Unit Award (VUA) for combat actions in the skies over Iraq, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Considered the unit equivalent of the Silver Star, the award was presented nearly seven years following their actions in Iraq. 

The 1-149th, along with E Troop, 1-104th Cavalry (Mississippi) and A Company, 1-135th ARB (Missouri), deployed for a year with the 36th Combat Aviation Brigade (CAB) in 2006 providing AH-64 “Apache” helicopter support as a Corps-level asset across the country. 

Citing the battalion’s significant impact on the war in the volatile Al Anbar province in western Iraq, the citation states, “the tenacity of the aircrews to engage the enemy and the constant drive of the units’ support elements enhanced the ability of coalition forces to bring the fight to the enemy, destroyed the enemy’s initiative and provided a safer and more secure existence for the people of Ar Ramadi, Iraq.”

The 1-149th’s success stems from their support of various units from across the U.S. military during the “pre-surge” and into the “surge” phases, one of the most deadly periods during the war. 

“The units performed superbly as a corps-level attack helicopter battalion, providing aerial weapons teams to the United States Army brigade combat teams, the Marine Expeditionary Force and Naval SEAL teams,” the citation states.

During combat operations, the battalion’s fleet of aircraft sustained significant damage due to the aircrew’s willingness to fly low and stay close to the fight, often drawing fire away from the ground troops they were supporting. In addition to the VUA, aviators from the 1-149th received 12 Distinguished Flying Crosses (DFC) and 39 Air Medals for Valor in the skies over Iraq. 

Two of the DFC’s were awarded after what became known as the Battle of Donkey Island on June 30th, 2007. 

During a ground attack against 20 insurgents guarding a weapons cache in Ar Ramadi, a U.S. Soldier was wounded by enemy forces. Medevac aircraft were unable to transport the critically-wounded soldier to a treatment facility. 

A 1-149th “Apache” landed on the battlefield and placed the wounded Soldier in the front seat of the aircraft. The co-pilot/gunner strapped himself to the aircraft fuselage, outside the cockpit, and the pilot flew the aircraft and wounded soldier to a medical facility.

Col. Rick Adams, commander of the Austin-based 36th CAB, served as the 1-149th’s commander during the Iraq deployment. 

Adams, of Austin, said, “I was honored and humbled to serve with such a capable team of men and women. Their endurance and tenacity saved lives while turning the tide of combat in Iraq.” 

The deployment to Iraq was Adams’ third tour, fighting with both active duty and National Guard Apache battalions. 

“I would not trade the Soldiers, skills and dedication of the 1-149th,” Adams said.

During the ceremony, the award streamer was placed on the battalion’s guidon by Col. Adams and 36th Infantry Division Commander, Maj. Gen. James K. “Red” Brown. 

The ceremony also included the official welcome home of B Company, 1-149th ARB which recently returned from a combat deployment to Tarin Kowt, Afghanistan. 

Adams, who visited B Company during their recent deployment, said he was “absolutely impressed by the graduate level of combat they had mastered. From our time in Iraq, I knew they were highly skilled and courageous warriors, but now they were doing it in extremely challenging, high-altitude environments, which requires perfect power management.” 

“I was further impressed by the fluid and seamless integration they made with the special operations teams they supported,” Adams said.

The 36th CAB returned home from a deployment to the Middle East in support of Operation Enduring Freedom just before Christmas. 

Current proposals under consideration by the Department of Defense include the option of having the 1-149th transfer their Apache helicopters to the Active Duty forces. 

The full citation awarding the Valorous Unit Award to the 1-149th ARB:

For extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States: During the period Aug. 22, 2006, to July 8, 2007, 1st Battalion, 149th Aviation Regiment, and the cited units, E Troop, 1-104th CAV and A Company, 1-135th ARB displayed extraordinary heroism in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The units performed superbly as a corps-level attack helicopter battalion, providing aerial weapons teams to the United States Army brigade combat teams, the Marine Expeditionary Force and Naval SEAL teams working in Ar Ramadi, Al Anbar Province, Iraq. The tenacity of the aircrews to engage the enemy and the constant drive of the units’ support elements enhanced the ability of coalition forces to bring the fight to the enemy, destroyed the enemy’s initiative and provided a safer and more secure existence for the people of Ar Ramadi, Iraq. The dedication of the Soldiers of the 1st Battalion, 149th Aviation Regiment and the cited units, to continuously accomplish the mission in the face of imminent danger, is in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and brings great credit upon the units, the 36th Combat Aviation Brigade, Multi-National Corps-Iraq and the United States Army.

Texas Guard shares disaster lessons with Chileans

Brigade Commander Col. Lee Schnell (left) discusses observations made during the Volcano VI emergency exercise with Chliean Army Brig. Gen. Miguel Alfonso Bellet (right), commander of the 1st Brigade "Coraceros," in Arica, Chile, Aug. 20, 2014.
In this image released by Joint Task Force 136 (Maneuver Enhancement Brigade), Brigade Commander Col. Lee Schnell (left) discusses observations made during the Volcano VI emergency exercise with Chilean Army Brig. Gen. Miguel Alfonso Bellet (right), commander of the 1st Brigade "Coraceros," in Arica, Chile, Aug. 20, 2014. This training event, which included a simulated earthquake and volcanic eruption, offered members of the Chilean emergency response community an opportunity to share best practices with representatives of the Texas Military Forces and the Texas Department of Public Safety. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Alfonso Garcia)

 

 Story by Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Griego

 ARICA, Chile - Natural disasters are a constant global threat, and response measures can vary wildly from nation to  nation.  The emergency preparedness communities of Chile and Texas are looking to bridge that gap in consequence  management  with long-term exchanges of best practices and training events. The most recent of which, Chile's Volcano VI  exercise,  brought together representatives of the Texas Military Forces, the Texas Department of Public Safety, the  Chilean Army,  and Chilean civilians in a robust, simulated incident in Arica, Chile. The scenario, held Aug. 18-22, featured  a simulated  earthquake and volcanic eruption that stressed the capabilities and cooperation of the Chilean Army, the  Chilean Office of  National Emergency Management, Ministry of Interior, the Carabineros de Chile (Federal Police), the  Regional Fire  Department, and many local civilian agencies.

 "It was very interesting to see how another country took on disaster preparedness and some of the things that they do that  are different from us, but are very effective," said Texas National Guard Col. Lee Schnell. As the commander of Joint Task  Force 136 (Maneuver Enhancement Brigade), the Guard unit responsible for the FEMA Region VI Homeland Response  Force mission, Col. Schnell has a vested interest in disaster response, having participated in and observed dozens of  exercises during the last four years.

 "Volcano VI took place in Arica this year," said Chilean Army Col. Edmundo Villarroel Geissbuhler, "and its purpose was to  provide the civilian authorities a training opportunity, in order to verify and update their disaster relief contingency plans. It  also allow them to check their communications flows, and interagency coordination, determining the needs of personnel,  materiel, equipment, and other resources, to successfully face an emergency or disaster caused by nature or human  influence."

 Not unlike our response plans and interagency agreements here in the United States, the disaster operations in Chile must  be tested and certified in accordance with high standards of efficiency.

"The purpose of the exercise was to validate the current emergency plans incorporated by the various participating agencies in attendance," said Sgt. 1st Class Alfonso Garcia, the International Affairs NCO for the Texas Military Forces. "The exercise players used a computer system that controlled and monitored the development of events during the disaster exercise."

The exercise primarily took place at the University of Tarapaca. Members of the Texas Military Forces and Texas Department of Public Safety were invited in order to provide feedback and share best practices from their own disaster management experience. 

"Here was an exercise and you had elected officials, their staffs, all engaged in this exercise, and that's difficult to do anywhere," said Schnell. "They really immersed themselves in the exercise. That was probably the thing that most impressed me, how everybody came to the table, it wasn't just the military and first responders."

Throughout the week, Chilean authorities met with the U.S. delegation to discuss not only the ongoing exercise, but also previous encounters with disaster response, such as this past April's magnitude 8.2 earthquake that hit Chile's coast and created a seven-foot tsunami. This background in natural incidents was instrumental in their successful validation at the university and in effectively discussing large-scale response measures. Other topics of discussion included logistical hurdles created by natural disasters and how to reach geographically isolated areas within their respective areas of responsibility. 

"During the exercise, they had the chance to interact with the Chilean representatives involved in it," said Villarroel Geissbuhler, about the Texas visitors. "They met representatives of the Chilean National Police, Army, government, Air Force, Navy, NGOs, etc., discussing with them different topics of mutual interest. At the end of the exercise, Col. Schnell also provided input during the AAR, not only from his perspective, but also from the Texas Military Forces and the U.S. Army South perspective, allowing the Chilean authorities to hear a different point of view. That will certainly be used as part of the lessons learned."

Interagency cooperation was a recurring theme for the week, as the two nations shared with each other how their militaries worked alongside civilian authorities. By inviting both civilian and military members of Texas' consequence management community, the Chilean forces were able to gain a neighboring perspective on asset allocation and the need to include all stakeholders in support of the citizens.

"While we attended the exercise in the role of observers and not evaluators," said Texas Department of Public Safety Capt. Luis Najera, "I feel it was important for the Chilean military forces and civilian authorities to understand the roles between the Texas Military Forces and the Department of Public Safety in Texas' response to emergencies. The Chilean government clearly understands the need to have all their governmental resources working together to respond to emergencies and natural disasters."

With so much on the line, the priority throughout the exercise was how best to serve the citizens of Chile in the fight to save lives. By sharing best practices through long-term partnerships like this, service members, first responders, and civil servants ensure a state of constant improvement and cooperative relationships.

"There was no doubt," said Najera, "that there was a strong commitment by both civilian and military authorities to continue to improve their country's emergency management response."

National Guard Supports DPS Along Texas Border

Airmen from the Texas Air National Guard observe a section of the Rio Grande River. The airmen are serving at the Texas-Mexico border in support of Operation Strong Safety
Airmen from the Texas Air National Guard observe a section of the Rio Grande River. The airmen are serving at the Texas-Mexico border in support of Operation Strong Safety. (U.S. Army photo by Maj. Randall Stillinger

 

By Maj. Randall Stillinger
36th Infantry Division Public Affairs

WESLACO, Texas - The Texas National Guard began taking up their observation posts along the Rio Grande River last month in an effort to reduce the amount of criminal activity in the border region.

Members of the Texas National Guard were mobilized by Governor Rick Perry to support the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS). 

This group of soldiers and airmen were the first troops to occupy positions along the river in support of Operation Strong Safety.

Utilizing high-powered optical equipment to observe sectors along the river, the National Guard acts as a force multiplier and allows DPS to focus on their law enforcement role in the region.

One soldier, who lives in the Rio Grande Valley, said that he “volunteered for this mission to help his community.” His last mission was in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

The soldier, who asked not to be identified for security reasons, was one of over 2,200 that volunteered for the up to 1,000 positions on this task force. He was in the first group of service members to man observation posts along the river.

“I’m a little nervous as we get ready to go,” he said. “but we’ve been trained really well and I know that we’re ready for this mission.”

“We’re doing it for a good cause. It will definitely have an impact.”

Operation Lone Star provides health care

Story by: Sgt. Adrian Shelton

Posted: September 5, 2014

Sgt. Suzanne Carter School-required immunizations are just one of the services that are provided at Operation Lone Star at six sites throughout the Rio Grande Valley region of South Texas, Aug. 4-8, 2014. Immunizations are available for both adults and children and are critical for preventing the spread of contagious diseases in vulnerable populations, such as children and seniors. Other services such as diabetes and vision screenings, health assessments and dental services are also available for the duration of Operation Lone Star. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Suzanne Carter, 100th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Texas Army National Guard/ Released)
Sgt. Suzanne Carter
School-required immunizations are just one of the services that are provided at Operation Lone Star at six sites throughout the Rio Grande Valley region of South Texas, Aug. 4-8, 2014. Immunizations are available for both adults and children and are critical for preventing the spread of contagious diseases in vulnerable populations, such as children and seniors. Other services such as diabetes and vision screenings, health assessments and dental services are also available for the duration of Operation Lone Star. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Suzanne Carter, 100th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Texas Army National Guard/ Released)

LAREDO, Texas - Texas Military Forces service members provided medical services to Rio Grande Valley area residents during day one of Operation Lone Star at the Civic Center in Laredo, Texas, Aug. 4, 2014.

The annual five-day training exercise provides dual opportunities for cooperative efforts among Texas Military Forces, local civil authorities, and Department of State Health Services and access to health care for people of all ages in South Texas. 

“It is a disaster preparedness exercise in which joint federal, state and local forces, as well as different agencies with many volunteers, provide free medical services to underserved members of the community,” said Erika M. Juarez, the Department of State Health Services public information officer at the Laredo Civic Center’s Medical Point of Dispensing. “This is the one time of the year they can get these medical services.”

Operation Lone Star, now in its sixteenth year, provides free blood pressure checks, cholesterol and diabetes screenings, hearing and vision exams, sports physicals, immunizations and limited dental services. 

Due to the additional number of military personnel, “we are able to provide more immunizations than last year,” said Sgt. 1st Class David I. Soto, the non-commissioned officer in charge of approximately 58 Texas Army National Guard personnel at the Laredo Civic Center MPOD. Soto, who works as a paramedic and military leadership course instructor in San Antonio, and is in his second year of working at OLS, said that many of the service members have or are seeking medical degrees.

This year’s Operation Lone Star is being conducted in Laredo, Mission, Rio Grande City, Pharr-San Juan, and Brownsville, from Aug. 4-7, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Aug. 8 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Those who wish to receive services or want to know more information should contact their county health department or dial 2-1-1.

Governor Perry tasked us to increase our support

Photo of MG John F. NicholsJuly 21,2014 - Today, Governor Perry tasked us to increase our support to the Texas Department of Public Safety’s Operation Strong Safety. The Texas National Guard will work in full support of this state-led border security surge operation to deter criminal activity along the Texas-Mexico border.  Within the next 30 days we will send additional forces to the border who will act as force multipliers for the state.  

We are not strangers to this mission.  Our forces will enhance security efforts by amplifying the visible presence on the ground and along the river; working alongside commissioned law enforcement officers to detect and prevent criminals from infiltrating through the international border, and helping to ensure the safety of our fellow Texans.  We have performed similar roles in support of various state and federal operations along the border since 2006.  To our Texas Guardsmen already engaged in border support missions, thank you for your selfless service and dedication to this important effort.

To those whom we will send, the state and nation once again need you.  In times of crisis, our civilian leaders call upon us without hesitation.  For many, I know this is not the first call; you’ve been called in the past to serve our state and nation.  Now the Governor of Texas is calling you to help secure our homeland.  Times of great need are why we wear the uniform and serve.  Times like these are why the Texas Guard exists.   

The citizens of Texas continue to honor us with their absolute trust and confidence.  They do so because they understand what I see every day:  you stand ready and willing to serve, whatever the call may be.  And I couldn’t be more proud of you.

This is a critical moment in our state and nation.  I’m thankful that at moments like this, Texas can rely on you for its safety and security.  Texas Strong!    

 

//Signed//

John F. Nichols
MAJOR General, TXANG
Adjutant General

 

 

 Letter from the Adjutant General