Posts From August, 2017

Texas National Guard Night Rescues - Hurricane Harvey

HOUSTON, TX, UNITED STATES

08.28.2017

Video by Sgt. Samuel De Leon

100th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

 

Texas National Guard soldiers conduct night rescue operations in flooded areas around Texas after devastation caused by Harvey. Video by Sgt. Sam DeLeon

Hurricane Harvey Texas National Guard rescue operations

HOUSTON, TX, UNITED STATES

08.27.2017

Video by 1st Lt. Zachary West

100th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

 

Footage of Texas National Guard soldiers conducting rescue operations in heavily flooded areas near Houston, Texas. The entire Texas National Guard has been called up in response to Harvey. 
Video by 1LT Zachary West, 100th MPAD)

Hurricane Harvey B-Roll 25 AUG

VICTORIA, TX, UNITED STATES

08.25.2017

Video by Sgt. Samuel De Leon

Texas Army National Guard (Texas Military Forces)

 

General B-Roll of Texas Guardsmen from the 176th Engineer Brigade, partnered with emergency first responders from Texas task Force One preparing for Hurricane Harvey to hit the Texas coast, Victoria, Texas, August 25, 2017.

Texas Soldiers prepare for Hurricane Harvey

BRYAN, TX, UNITED STATES

08.25.2017

Video by Sgt. Daisy Broker

72nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (36th ID, TXARNG)

 

Texas Army National Guard Soldiers joined members of a Texas Task Force One Swift Water Rescue Team for interoperability training leading up to Hurricane Harvey, in Bryan, Texas, August 25, 2017. Training included loading and unloading Zodiac boats, use and recovery of throw bags, and the utilization of life vests and other safety equipment. Members of the Texas Army National Guard are being mobilized across the state as part of hurricane response operations.

Texas flying squadron celebrates 100th Anniversary

Photo By Staff Sgt. Daniel Martinez | The 111th Attack Squadron at Ellington Field, Texas, celebrates their 100th anniversary on August 12, 2017 at Ellington Field, Texas. The 147th Reconnaissance Wing was also redesignated to the 147th Attack Wing. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez)
Photo By Staff Sgt. Daniel Martinez | The 111th Attack Squadron at Ellington Field, Texas, celebrates their 100th anniversary on August 12, 2017 at Ellington Field, Texas. The 147th Reconnaissance Wing was also redesignated to the 147th Attack Wing. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez)

08.22.2017

Story by: Staff Sgt. Daniel Martinez

The 111th Attack squadron, known as the Ace-in-the-Hole Squadron, is the flying unit assigned to the 147th Attack Wing.

The ceremony included guest speaker Maj. General John F. Nichols, Adjutant General of the TXANG and a flag furling and unfurling ceremony.

“This was a great occasion to be a part of. It marks a powerful milestone for the fine men and women of the 147th Attack Wing.” said Maj. General David McMinn, commander of the Texas Air National Guard. “I am proud of the great Airmen here for their dedication to the mission and their great work.”

The flag furling and unfurling ceremony revealed the redesignation of the 147th Reconnaissance Wing to the 147th ATKW and was performed by Col. Gary D. Jones, commander of the 147th ATKW. 

“For a century the men and women of the 111th have proudly answered the call to arms for our nation in times of war, and rendered aid to our fellow Texans in times of crisis. These are duties that the Aces hold sacred and when called upon we will continue to perform them with pride. As our MQ-1 mission comes to a close and we begin a new century of Texas airpower, we are preparing for our conversion to the MQ-9 Reaper,” said Lt. Col. David Peck, commander of the 111th Attack Squadron. “We are grateful to the Aces that have come before us and paved the way, and we are committed to serving our nation and the great state of Texas with distinction.”

The redesignation comes after the wing received a new aircraft, the MQ-9 Reaper in place of their previous MQ-1 Predator.

The ceremony was concluded with a C-130 jump exercise from members of the 147th Air Support Operations 

THE MINUTE MAN MODEL

The minuteman models an innovative way to look at how Texas Military Department deploys Annual training through out the force, saving time money and space.

Texas Military STARBASE summer camp inspires children

Photo By Sgt. Michael Giles | Children learn to use computer-aided design and drafting software on the 2nd day of STARBASE Summer Camp at Camp Mabry, August 1, 2017. STARBASE is a Department of Defense-funded program that encourages children to have fun with the STEM disciplines of science, technology, engineering and math. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Michael Giles)
Photo By Sgt. Michael Giles | Children learn to use computer-aided design and drafting software on the 2nd day of STARBASE Summer Camp at Camp Mabry, August 1, 2017. STARBASE is a Department of Defense-funded program that encourages children to have fun with the STEM disciplines of science, technology, engineering and math. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Michael Giles)

08.01.2017

Story by Sgt. Michael Giles

AUSTIN, Texas - "When I was a kid, Whitney Houston really reached me with 'the children are the future,'” said Ivy Williams, Deputy Director of STARBASE Austin. 

“And they are our future.” Williams asserted. “We just really need to work at pointing them towards a future where they'll have success.”

The STARBASE Austin staff held their 5th annual week-long summer camp for children of Texas Military Department employees, July 31, 2017 at Camp Mabry in Austin.

STARBASE is a Department of Defense-funded program that brings children onto military installations, like Camp Mabry, to have fun with the STEM disciplines of science, technology, engineering and math. 

“What’s exciting about today is I have an opportunity to bring my son and his friend to participate in STARBASE,” said Sgt. 1st Class Marcel Ruales, a logistics non-commissioned officer with the Texas Joint Counterdrug Task Force. “It’s so exciting just to see our kids come over and have an opportunity to grow and learn.”

STARBASE brings math and science to life for students by giving them real-life technological problems to solve, explained STARBASE instructor Laura Badkoobeh.

"One of the things we say at STARBASE quite often is 'hands-on-minds-on,' and what that means for students is that they're getting their hands dirty, working and learning together in science, technology, engineering and math,” Badkoobeh said. "They're working to solve problems they may face in real life as they get older. They're developing skills that will take them far in their careers and in life."

The first engineering challenge they faced this year was to build a bridge out of lasagna.

“Our students start out doing operation bridge quest,” said Emily Bell, STARBASE Austin’s program specialist. “The students have an urgent mission to build a bridge for the town of water’s edge so that they can get food and water within ten days. Our students are given that problem. They go in and they have a problem to solve and explore.”

Schools from all across Central Texas transport students to Camp Mabry to attend STARBASE throughout the year. Williams explained that STARBASE serves an important role in the community by collaborating with independent school districts to facilitate learning opportunities that some districts may not easily afford to provide on their own. 

“Some schools have more resources and are able to provide more STEM education than others,” Williams said. “STARBASE Austin is here to fill that gap so that all kids have the same opportunities to understand how important STEM careers are.”

STARBASE Austin also collaborates with its sponsor, the Texas Joint Counterdrug Task Force, whose members regularly attend to provide additional mentorship and inspiration to make good decision and pursue fascinating careers.

We are so excited to have a partnership with Counterdrug Task Force here on post,” Bell enthused. “We have soldiers that come out and sit with our students and encourage them and motivate them and ask some questions. They remind our students how important it is to make positive decisions and if they make a mistake to take responsibility for it and how to push forward.”